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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-054 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, died in a PMV-4 mishap 1 Oct 2020, at 0230 local. While traveling south on the highway, the Soldier lost control of his vehicle, veered off of the east shoulder, and traveled an additional 260 feet before landing in a ditch approximately 80 feet east of the shoulder. Soldiers from the unit discovered the mishap scene two days later when the Soldier failed to report for duty and the unit leadership contacted 911. Hawaii State Police and ambulatory services arrived and pronounced the Soldier dead at the scene. Upon discovery, the Soldier was not fastened into his seat, the driver side seat belt was found in the buckled position, and appeared to be fastened underneath the Soldier at the time of the collision. Investigation of the nearby scene and of the Soldier’s vehicle showed no evidence that suggested his vehicle was struck prior to exiting the road and landing in the ditch. The Soldier had a blood alcohol content of .28 which was three times over the legal limit (.08). It was reported that the Soldier was driving at excessive speeds while highly intoxicated.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 23rd PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


In 2018, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities. Speed also affects your safety even when you are driving at the speed limit but too fast for road conditions, such as during bad weather, when a road is under repair, or in an area at night that isn’t well lit.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
- Greater potential for loss of vehicle control;
- Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment;
- Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger;
- Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries;
- Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and
- Increased fuel consumption/cost.

Of the 22,215 passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2019, 47% were not wearing seat belts. 55% of those killed driving at night in 2019 were unrestrained.

1. Buckling up helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle, whereas not buckling up can result in being totally ejected from the vehicle in a crash, which is almost always deadly.

2. Air bags are not enough to protect you; in fact, the force of an air bag can seriously injure or even kill you if you’re not buckled up.

3. Improperly wearing a seat belt, such as putting the strap below your arm, puts you and your children at risk in a crash.

The benefits of buckling up are equally clear. If you buckle up in the front seat of a passenger car, you can reduce your risk of:
- Fatal injury by 45% (Kahane, 2015)
- Moderate to critical injury by 50%
- If you buckle up in a light truck, you can reduce your risk of:
- Fatal injury by 60% (Kahane, 2015)
- Moderate to critical injury by 65% (NHTSA, 1984)

Every day, about 28 people in the United States die in drunk-driving crashes — that's one person every 52 minutes. In 2019, these deaths reached the lowest percentage since 1982 when NHTSA started reporting alcohol data — but still 10,142 people lost their lives. These deaths were all preventable.

Always make good decisions and plan ahead. Here are some solutions to avoid drunk driving:
- Always choose a non-drinking designated driver — every time you go out.
- If you go out alone, do not drink alcohol. Order a non-alcoholic beverage such as a soft drink or water.
- Never feel pressured to drink alcohol. If you do plan on drinking, do so responsibly. Eat plenty of food and drink water.
- If you've been drinking, call a taxi or car-sharing service for a ride, like Uber or Lyft.
- Never get in a car with a driver who has been drinking.
- Protect others by taking their keys if they attempt to drive after consuming alcohol. They may be mad at you, but the alternative is much worse.

Driving a vehicle while impaired is a dangerous crime. Tough enforcement of drunk-driving laws has been a major factor in reducing drunk-driving deaths since the 1980s. Charges range from misdemeanors to felony offenses, and penalties for impaired driving can include driver’s license revocation, fines, and jail time. It’s also extremely expensive. A first-time offense can cost the driver upwards of $10,000 in fines and legal fees.

 

 

PLR 21-053 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Major assigned to United States Army National Guard, Saint Joseph, Missouri, activated under Title 32 orders for training at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 13 April 2021 in Pleasant Hill, Missouri. The Soldier was driving to work when he pulled out of a gas station and into the path of an 18-wheeler that hit the driver’s side of the vehicle. After both vehicles came to rest, the truck driver called 911. Emergency Medical Services and Missouri State Highway Patrol arrived, and EMS performed life-saving steps. Initial reports state that the Soldier was not wearing his seat belt. At this time, it is reported that there were no indications of speed and alcohol being contributing factors to the mishap. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital and pronounced dead upon arrival by the attending physician. The civilian truck driver suffered non-fatal injuries. An investigation is currently ongoing by the local authorities.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 22nd PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


Do you always wear your seat belt? You should. Statistics show that you're always safer in a car accident wearing a seat belt than not wearing one.
The main purpose of a seat belt is to keep vehicle occupants safe in the event of a crash. The seat belt functions by keeping the occupant in a more static motion despite a sudden stop or change in momentum. A car moves with inertia, which is an object’s tendency to move until something works against the motion of that object.

Knowing is the first step in preventing.

Follow these important seat belt safety tips – they could save your life:
- Always buckle up before driving or riding in a car. This goes for everyone in the vehicle, whether you're sitting in the front or the back.
- Wear the lap belt low across the hips and below your stomach.
- Wear the shoulder belt over your collarbone, away from your neck. It should cross over your chest. In most new cars, you can adjust shoulder belts to improve their height and fit.
-A seat belt that works properly will keep you at a safe distance from the dashboard and the airbag
- Children should never sit in the front passenger seat until they reach at least age 13.
- Secure all young children in child safety seats.
- If you're pregnant and riding in a car, make sure the safety belt is snug against your hips. Loose belts can cause broken ribs or injuries to your belly. Never put a lap belt across your stomach when you're pregnant.

 

 

PLR 21-051- PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky died in a PMV-4 mishap 10 April 2021 on the installation, at 0815 local. The Soldier lost control of his vehicle, exited the road, rolled, struck a tree, and came to rest with the roof of his vehicle against the tree. As a result of the roof striking against the tree, it crushed the Soldier. It is unknown at this point if he was wearing his seat belt or if alcohol was involved, but the survivable space inside the vehicle had been compromised.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 21st PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


One of the most terrifying car accidents is a rollover. In fact, almost 10,000 people die from rollovers every year. Some vehicles, especially SUVs, have improved to help prevent the number of rollovers. Driver error still accounts for most of these. Preventing a rollover requires a driver to remain alert and drive cautiously.

Driver Safety on How to Prevent a Rollover

Tires
Keep a check on tire pressure. If your tire becomes over or under-inflated, you may be setting yourself up for a rollover. Visit your local vehicle service dealership to get this tested and/or invest in a tire gauge and check tire pressure at least once per week. Gauges only cost a few dollars and can help save your life.

Speeding Never Helped Anyone
Driving fast may seem like a good idea at a time, but the faster you drive, the less control you have over your vehicle. Something as simple as a curve or changing lanes could cause you to roll your vehicle. There is a reason a speed limit is set. This is the safe driving speed and should be obeyed.

Watch What You Haul
When hauling anything, pay careful attention to weight and how the load is positioned. The heavier your load, the slower you can respond to unexpected situations. The faster you maneuver, the more you load can shift which results in a rollover. Also, a badly positioned load could shift, no matter how careful you are. Your load should be carefully positioned to distribute weight and prevent movement as you drive.

Be Aware of Road Conditions
Pay attention to weather. Rain, snow, ice, and wind can all create road conditions perfect for a rollover. Know how the weather will be where you are driving and take the appropriate precautions. Precautions may include driving slower, taking a different route, or staying off the roads altogether. Do whatever you need to do to stay safe.

Country Roads
Take extra care when driving on country roads. There are hazards such as animals and sharp curves. Also, the speed limit is usually higher than on city roads. Taking a curve too fast or swerving to avoid an animal could very well result in a rollover. Keep your eyes open for obstacles and slow down for curves.

Never Jerk the Wheel
Swerving to avoid a car, animal, or another obstacle may make you want to jerk the steering wheel. Jerking the wheel too suddenly may cause your vehicle to roll. Also, if you run off the side of the road, gently maneuver back onto the road without panicking and jerking the steering wheel. Sudden steering changes are the cause of many rollovers and could be prevented by staying calm and in control of the vehicle. Steer firmly and as slowly as possible to avoid rollovers.

 

 

PLR 21-048 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina died in a PMV-4 mishap 3 April 2021 in Colerain, North Carolina, at 2350 local. The Soldier was traveling on I-295 near State Road1313 in an unknown direction, when he lost control of his vehicle and exited the roadway. Emergency Medical Services arrived on scene and pronounced the Soldier dead. At 2350, the North Carolina Highway State Patrol (NCSHP) reported a fatal traffic accident to the Fort Bragg Law Enforcement Center Desk Sergeant, involving a Soldier within their jurisdiction. The Soldier’s unit was notified, and he was transported to the local hospital where his family identified the body. The Investigation continues by NCSHP. Alcohol is not suspected as a contributing factor. Additional specifics of the mishap, including Soldier’s use of seat belt and speed as contributing factors are unknown at this time. No further information is available at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 20th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions

Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. Remember that, as a pedestrian, your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

-Put down your phone. Smartphones and handheld electronic devices are a daily part of life, but they take your eyes off of the road and distract your attention.
-Don’t wear headphones. Your ears will tell you a lot about what is happening around you – be sure to use them.
-Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
-Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
-Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
-Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
-Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
-Maintain the posted speed limit.
-Always wear your seatbelt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 21-046 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-4 mishap 27 March 2021 on the installation at 0403 local. The Soldier was driving in the wrong direction on a four-lane divided highway when she hit a vehicle operated by another Soldier. The other Soldier’s vehicle became airborne and flipped several times. The Soldier who was driving in the wrong direction was pronounced dead at the scene. The other Soldier was transported to the hospital for multiple injuries and airlifted to the local medical center for surgeries and further treatment. He is in critical but stable condition. It was reported that both Soldiers were wearing seat belts. Alcohol was suspected of being a contributing factor to the mishap. An investigation is ongoing by the local authorities in conjunction with the Fort Bragg Criminal Investigations Division. The POC is waiting for local authorities and medical personnel to release additional information.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 19th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

Plenty of people know that drinking and driving don't mix — but many still do it. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are over 300,000 incidents of drinking and driving each day. And arrest doesn't typically mark the first time a person drives under the influence. The average drunk driver does so over 80 times before getting caught. The risks are high, but the solutions are simple.

What is drinking and driving?
States differ in what they call it — driving under the influence, driving while intoxicated, drunk driving or impaired driving — but in every state, a baseline blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent is considered an offense. For those age 21 and under, zero-tolerance laws criminalize driving with very small amounts of alcohol. States may also have enhanced penalties in place for those who drive with very high BACs, minors in the vehicle or multiple convictions.

What are the consequences of drinking and driving?
When you drink and drive, you're compromising cognitive ability and responsiveness, which increases your risk for an accident. In fact, 28 people die each day because of a drunk driving crash. Get caught, and a single drinking and driving infraction may have legal, financial, personal and even professional ramifications.

- Most states suspend your license for varying lengths of time — sometimes up to a year. Multiple convictions typically equal a revocation of a license. Drivers with a commercial driver’s license (CDL) might have their licenses suspended for a longer period.
- The employers of drivers with a CDL could also be liable for the actions of the driver. The driver’s future employment might also be impacted.
- Some states require mandatory jail time — even for a first offense — as well as fees and fines.
- You may be required to install an ignition interlock device on your car; if it detects alcohol, it will prevent you from operating the vehicle.
- A single drunk driving conviction may lead to job loss or restrictions (i.e., operating company vehicles).
- Higher insurance rates almost always accompany drunk driving convictions.
- If you were involved in an accident as a result of drunk driving, your insurance may deny payment for injury treatment.

How can you detect drunk drivers?
Law enforcement officials say there are several signs associated with drinking and driving. Keeping these in mind will help avoid a dangerous situation:

- Making wide turns
- Weaving, swerving, drifting or straddling the center line
- Almost striking an object or vehicle
- Driving on the wrong side of the road
- Driving at a very slow speed
- Stopping without cause
- Braking erratically
- Responding slowly to traffic signals
- Turning abruptly or illegally
- Driving after dark with headlights off

How can you stop drinking and driving?
Always make good decisions and plan ahead. Here are some solutions to avoid drunk driving:

- Always choose a non-drinking designated driver — every time you go out.
- If you go out alone, do not drink alcohol. Order a non-alcoholic beverage such as a soft drink or water.
- Never feel pressured to drink alcohol. If you do plan on drinking, do so responsibly. Eat plenty of food and drink water.
- If you've been drinking, call a taxi or car-sharing service for a ride, like Uber or Lyft.
- Never get in a car with a driver who has been drinking.
- Protect others by taking their keys if they attempt to drive after consuming alcohol. They may be mad at you, but the alternative is much worse.

 

 

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