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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-003 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Private assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 9 October 2020 in Clarksville, Tennessee, at 0218 local. The Soldier was riding as a passenger in a private motor vehicle that ran a red light and was struck by a fuel tanker truck. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier was wearing his seat belt. Speed and alcohol use are unknown at this time. This mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the first off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

How to be a better passenger:
Making yourself useful – whether you offer to operate the GPS or act as another set of eyes for the driver – can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue.
Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task at hand.
Keeping a watchful eye for things the driver might miss is helpful; criticizing every move the driver makes could be harmful. If the driver gets frustrated or annoyed, it’s likely they’ll pay less attention to the road, which could lead to an easily avoidable accident.

Reminders while on the road:
1.Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2.Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3.Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
4.Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
5.Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
6.Maintain the posted speed limit.
7.Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 


PLR 21-002 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Irwin, California, died in a PMV-2 mishap 11 October 2020 near Huntington Beach, California, at 0400 local. The regimental staff duty noncommissioned officer received a call from the Soldier’s father stating the Soldier and his brother were involved in a crash while riding separate motorcycles. The brother reportedly died on the scene. The Soldier was transported by first responders to the local medical center, where he died during surgery. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of personal protective equipment, completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses, and contributing factors are unknown at this time due to lack of witnesses. The unit is awaiting additional information from the local authorities.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the second PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Create a space cushion around your vehicle.

A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – four or five seconds in inclement weather.

If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.

 

 


PLR 21-001 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Rucker, Alabama, died in a PMV-2 mishap 8 October 2020 in Newton, Alabama, at 1625 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he collided with a vehicle that pulled out in front of him. He was transported to the local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment and had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse I and II. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the first PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

Drivers often do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.


Create a space cushion around your vehicle.

A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – four or five seconds in inclement weather.

If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.

 

 

PLR 20-090 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 30 September 2020 in El Paso, Texas, at 2238 local. The Soldier suffered fatal injuries when his motorcycle was struck by another vehicle that ran a red light. He was pronounced dead by the medical examiner’s office. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment but was counseled by the unit commander not to ride, and not authorized to ride a motorcycle. He did not complete the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation BasicRider Course (BRC-I). The involvement of alcohol is unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the 22nd PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period the previous year.


Motorcycle Safety Tips for Car Drivers:
Driving with a motorcycle near you isn’t like driving with other cars. Motorcycles are often smaller and harder to see, plus they don't have the safeguards of metal framing, seatbelts, or airbags when it comes to protection from collision. That's why drivers sharing the road with motorcycles need to be extra careful so everyone arrives at their destination safely.

Here are some important ways drivers can observe motorcycle safety:
- Always signal, check mirrors, and check blind spots. These behaviors are good habits to begin with, and they are doubly important when sharing the road with motorcycles. Because they are more compact, motorcycles may go unnoticed in a casual glance before a lane change, especially in low light or bad weather.

- Large vehicles, watch out! If you are driving a big truck or a van, you already know that your vision can be limited. Your blind spots are larger than those of other vehicles, making it harder to see smaller cars and motorcycles around you. Be cautious when making turns or changing lanes by keeping in mind that a biker might be harder to see.

- Give them the whole lane. You may think that because motorcycles are smaller and don't take up the entire lane, it's alright to pass them in the same lane. Think again. Give a bike the full lane, the same way you would any other car and driver.

- Treat motorcycle turn signals with caution. If you approach a motorcycle with an activated turn signal, wait for a moment to see what they'll do. Unlike cars, most motorcycle signals often aren't self-cancelling, so the driver has to remember to manually turn the signal off. Give yourself and the motorcyclist a moment to ensure they are actually turning.

- Give motorcycles extra following and passing distance. Many motorcyclists often slow down by only rolling off the throttle or downshifting (instead of outright braking), so you may not always see brake lights to alert you of a bike's stop. Allow for three to four seconds of following time for motorcycles, and always assume a bike will brake when approaching a stop at an intersection. Drivers who cut off or unintentionally pull in front of a motorcycle without allowing enough space can force the rider to over-brake, slide and fall.

Motorcycle Safety Tips for Bikers:
Bikers themselves should always make sure to take precautions of their own, including wearing the right gear and riding in the right part of the lane. For more motorcycle driving tips visit https://safety.army.mil/OFF-DUTY/PMV-2-Motorcycles

 

 

PLR 20-089 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 21-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Wainwright, Alaska, died in a PMV-4 mishap 29 September 2020 in North Pole, Alaska, at 1654. The Soldier was operating his vehicle, when he was involved in a collision with another non-military vehicle. Emergency personnel evacuated the Soldier via ambulance to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead by the attending physician. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of seat belt and speed as a factor, are unknown at this time. Initial reports reflect that the use of alcohol does not appear to be a factor. State Troopers are investigating the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 29TH PMV-4 fatality of FY20 but below the number of similar fatalities during the same time period last year.

Here are important safety tips to focus on while driving:
1. Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
4. Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
5. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
6. Maintain the posted speed limit.
7. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

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