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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

PLRs are intended to be used as an engagement tool for leaders to discuss the hazards and trends impacting Soldier safety and readiness. A PLR contains only basic information, as the investigation is ongoing, but provides sufficient background to allow leaders an opportunity to communicate risk at the Soldier level.

 

PLR 24-060 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2

A 29-year-old Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Cavazos, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap in Killeen, Texas, at local. The Soldier was riding from a pool hall to his home when he was struck by a vehicle at an intersection. The Killeen Police Department (KPD) responded and transported him to the local emergency room, where he was pronounced dead. The Soldier was not wearing personal protective equipment, registered as a motorcycle rider or had a record of motorcycle safety training. Speed and the alcohol involvement are currently unknown. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for the KPD to release its final report.

Since FY19, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 23rd off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY24 and above the number of fatalities for the same time last year.

Safety tip

  1. Utilize road awareness and effective riding strategies:
    • Implement the SEE system (Search, Evaluate, Execute) for heightened road awareness.
    • Be extra alert at intersections, on side streets, near driveways and in parking lots.
    • Give yourself space and time as you search for traps and escape paths.
    • Give other motorists time and space to respond to you.
    • Use lane positioning to see and be seen.
    • Search for vehicles that may turn across your path, especially at intersections.
    • Use your turn signals for all turns and lane changes.
    • Ride as if you’re invisible.
    • Don’t ride when you are tired or under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.
    • Know and follow the rules of the road.
    • Utilizing techniques for increasing your visibility to others and enhancing your ability to see other road users are vital for safety, especially at intersections.
  2. Always wear the mandatory gear for riders:
    • A helmet manufactured to meet U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) or Snell standards
    • Eye protection that meets ANSI code Z87.1
    • Long pants and long-sleeved shirt
    • Sturdy, over-the-ankle footwear
    • Full-fingered gloves
    • Use bright clothing and a light-colored helmet to increase the chances of being seen.
    • Always dress for a crash as well as for the ride.
  3. Legal responsibilities: Understand your legal responsibilities, which cover licensing requirements and the necessity of having insurance. Adhering to these legalities ensures a safe and lawful riding experience.
  4. Train to ride safe: The Progressive Motorcycle Program training provides courses that are designed to keep motorcycle operator training current and to sustain or enrich rider skills. Riders must learn and adopt the basic and advanced skills of straight-line riding, turning, clutch/throttle control, shifting and stopping, cornering, swerving and emergency braking.

 

 

PLR 24-059 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims Two Soldiers' Lives

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4

Two Specialists assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in a PMV-4 mishap in Pierce County, Washington, at local. Three Soldiers were riding in a vehicle when another vehicle traveling on the wrong side of the highway struck them head-on. Soldier No. 1 (driver) and Soldier No. 2 (passenger) sustained fatal injuries. Soldier No. 3 sustained non-fatal injuries. According to the Washington State Patrol, it was suspected the operator of the other vehicle was driving under the influence. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the Soldiers use of seat belts, or speed are currently unknown. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for law enforcement to release its final report.

Since FY19, the Army has lost an average of 35 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 25th and 26th off-duty PMV-4 fatalities of FY24 and above the number of fatalities for the same time last year.

Safety tip

According to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, wrong-way accidents contributed to an average of 400 traffic deaths per year in a recent six-year period.

Stay Calm and Avoid Making Any Sudden Movements
If you see a wrong-way driver coming toward you, stay calm and avoid making any sudden movements like swerving. This will help you maintain control of your vehicle and avoid an accident and could help you make a safer decision about what to do next.

Move to the Right
If you can, safely move your vehicle to the right-hand side of the road. This will give the wrong-way driver more room to pass and may help avoid a collision. You may be worried about damaging your car by running over a curb, but taking decisive action to get completely out of the wrong-way driver’s path is the most important thing for you to focus on.

Drive Defensively
Even if you follow all these tips, there is still a chance you could be involved in an accident with a wrong-way driver. Drive defensively at all times and be mindful of the possibility that a wrong-way driver could enter your path. Be extra cautious when driving at night or during periods of low visibility, as this is when wrong-way accidents are most likely to occur.

Do Not Swerve
Swerving out of the way of a wrong-way driver can actually put you in more danger. You could lose control of your vehicle or end up in oncoming traffic. Instead, slow down and come to a stop if possible, making sure that there are no pedestrians, cyclists or others on the road who may be at risk of being struck by your vehicle as you attempt to move to safety.

Use Your Horn
Use your horn to warn the wrong-way driver that they are coming toward you. If they do not respond, you can flash your headlights at them as well. However, it is important that you do not rely on this tactic to stay safe because if the driver does not realize they are going the wrong way, your horn or flashing lights may do little or nothing to make them realize their mistake. The hope, though, is that the wrong-way driver is simply confused and not aware that they are going the wrong way. Your lights and horn may help them realize their mistake and get them back onto the right side of the road.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings
Pay attention to your surroundings at all times when you are driving. This will help you spot a wrong-way driver before they get too close to you. It is important for all drivers to keep their attention and focus on the road, including farther down the road, to hopefully notice something dangerous like a driver heading in the wrong lane and act quickly without needing to make a split-second decision. Always be alert for signs that indicate a wrong-way driver may be present, such as headlights coming towards you in your traffic lane.

Look For an Escape Route
If you see a wrong-way driver coming toward you, look for an escape route. This could be a side street or a parking lot. If you can, get out of the way of the wrong-way driver before they get to you. Being aware of your surroundings and staying mindful of what is at the farthest point in the road you can see will buy you valuable time to recognize the dangerous situation, slow your vehicle, and move to the escape route without swerving or putting others in additional danger.

Call 911
If you can safely do so, call 911 and report the wrong-way driver. Give them as much information as possible, such as where you are, where you saw the driver enter the highway, and what direction they are heading. Alerting the authorities quickly can help save lives and ensure that everyone is safe. Never assume that someone else has called. DO NOT try to follow the driver or stop them — leave it to the professionals.

 

 

PLR 24-058 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2

A 27-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-2 mishap in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at local. The Soldier was reportedly involved in a single-vehicle accident. The Colorado State Police Department (CSPD) responded and discovered the Soldier dead at the scene. CSPD notified Fort Carson Military Police. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the accident sequence details, completion of the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training, licensing, use of personal protective equipment, speed, or the involvement of alcohol as contributing factors, are currently unknown.

Since FY19, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year in PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 22nd fatality of FY24 and above the number of fatalities for the same time last year.

 

 

PLR 24-057 – Off-Duty Sports, Recreation and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation

A 26-year-old Staff Sergeant assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in an off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap in Cascade Ridge, Washington, at local. The Soldier was hiking and fell 400 feet off a cliff. It was reported the Soldier lost contact with people that knew he would be hiking. Search-and-rescue personnel tracked the Soldier's location via GPS and discovered his body.

Since FY19, the Army has lost an average of 12 Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This mishap was the third off-duty sports, recreation and physical training fatality of FY24 and the same number of fatalities as this time last year.

Safety tip

Hiking Safety

  • Take your time and watch your step – Be careful and watch where you are walking, especially on slippery areas or near cliffs. Stick to dry paths and solid rock areas with good footing.
  • Don’t get too distracted – Pay attention when taking photos, videos or just looking at the scenery. Watch your step. There will often be uneven ground, holes, bumps on rocks and stumps near the cliff’s edge. Tripping can cause a fall as easily as slipping.
  • Only use the designated paths – Take notice of any warning signs and fences in place, be responsible and don’t take any unnecessary risks.
  • Make sure that you are properly equipped for walking along paths – Remember to wear sturdy shoes or boots and check the weather forecast. Carry a fully charged mobile phone and tell someone where you are going and what time you will be home.
  • Do not attempt to climb up or down cliffs – Unless you are properly equipped and trained to do so, do not attempt to climb cliffs as a shortcut back to the top.
  • Stay away from the bottom of cliffs – When standing at the bottom of a cliff, we always advise people that they should not stand less than the height of the cliff away. That means that if the cliff is 25 meters high, don’t go closer than 25 meters toward it.

 

 

PLR 24-056 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2

A 33-year-old Captain assigned to Camp Humphreys, Korea, died in a PMV-2 mishap in Pyeongtaek, Republic of Korea, at local. The Soldier was riding his motorcycle home from work and was reportedly involved in a traffic accident. First responders arrived on scene, performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation and transported the Soldier to the local university hospital. Upon arrival, the attending physician pronounced the Soldier dead. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the accident sequence details, completion of the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training, licensing, the Soldier’s use of personal protective equipment, speed or the involvement of alcohol as contributing factors, are currently unknown. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for law enforcement to release its final report.

Since FY19, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 21st PMV-2 fatality of FY24 and above the number of fatalities for the same time last year.

Safety tip

Understanding Motorcycle Laws in South Korea
Before you rev your engine, familiarize yourself with the motorcycle laws in South Korea to ride confidently and responsibly. Riding a motorcycle in South Korea comes with specific laws and regulations that you need to be aware of to ensure a safe and legally compliant journey.

One important law to note is that motorcycles are not allowed on highways in South Korea. You must stay in the right-hand lane when riding in the city. City riding can be challenging, as drivers can be aggressive. It is recommended to ride on the open roads outside of the cities, where traffic is more predictable, and you can enjoy the beautiful scenery.

If you plan to ride in South Korea, it is crucial to understand the traffic laws and driving regulations. This includes knowledge of traffic signals and directions, traffic lanes, right-of-way, speed limits, passing, driving through intersections and parking. Being familiar with these rules will help you navigate the roads safely and avoid any unnecessary accidents.

Motorcycle, Moped and Bicycle Safety Rules
In addition to the general traffic laws, there are specific safety rules that apply to motorcycles, mopeds and bicycles in South Korea. These rules are designed to ensure the safety of not only the riders but also other road users.

Some key safety rules to keep in mind include wearing a helmet at all times, using appropriate hand signals when turning or changing lanes and obeying all traffic laws. It is also important to be cautious around pedestrians, as they may expect vehicles to yield to them.

By following the laws and practicing safe riding techniques, you can have a memorable and enjoyable motorcycle trip in South Korea while prioritizing safety for yourself and others on the road.

Motorcycle Laws

  • No motorcycles allowed on highways
  • Stay in the right-hand lane in the city
  • Follow traffic signals and directions
  • Observe right-of-way rules
  • Adhere to speed limits
  • Pass safely and legally
  • Follow rules for driving through intersections
  • Park in designated areas

Motorcycle Safety Rules

  • Wear a helmet at all times
  • Use hand signals when turning or changing lanes
  • Obey all traffic laws
  • Be cautious around pedestrians

Riding Safely in South Korea
Stay safe and prepared throughout your motorcycle trip in South Korea by following these essential safety tips and guidelines. Understanding the unique traffic laws and driving regulations in South Korea is crucial for a smooth and hassle-free ride. Here are some key tips to keep in mind:

  1. Be cautious around pedestrians: In South Korea, pedestrians may expect vehicles to yield to them. Always be aware of pedestrians and give them the right of way when necessary.
  2. Stay aware of other vehicles: South Korean roads can be busy and crowded. Pay attention to other vehicles around you, anticipate their movements, and drive defensively to avoid potential accidents.
  3. Follow traffic laws: Familiarize yourself with the traffic signals, right-of-way rules, and speed limits in South Korea. Adhere to the laws and regulations to ensure your safety and the safety of others on the road.
  4. Plan your routes: Before embarking on your motorcycle journey, plan your routes carefully. Avoid busy city areas where drivers may be aggressive, and instead opt for open roads outside the cities. This will not only make your ride more enjoyable but also reduce the risk of accidents.

Tips provided by Daniel Shakibaie Pack up and Ride
20 Tips & Laws to know before your Motorcycle trip in South Korea (packupandride.com)

 

 

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