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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-018 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Riley, Kansas died in a PMV-4 mishap 21 November 2020 in Perry, Oklahoma, at 0900 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle when he departed the roadway and rear-ended a 2016 Freightliner legally parked on the shoulder. The Soldier was taken to the local hospital and pronounced dead upon arrival by the attending physician. It is currently unknown if speed, seat belt use, or alcohol were factors that contributed to the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the eighth PMV-4 fatality of FY21.
Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions

Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. As a pedestrian your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

-Put down your phone. Smartphones and handheld electronic devices are a daily part of life, but they take your eyes off of the road and distract your attention.
-Don’t wear headphones. Your ears will tell you a lot about what is happening around you – be sure to use them.
-Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
-Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
-Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
-Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
-Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
-Maintain the posted speed limit.
-Always wear your seatbelt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 21-017 - POW Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a privately owned weapons (POW) mishap 14 November 2020 in Killeen, Texas. Witnesses stated the Soldier was handling another Soldier’s POW at a party when a discharged round struck him in the head. The Soldier was taken by ambulance to the local hospital and underwent emergency surgery, but later died from his injuries.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of four Soldiers a year to POW mishaps. This mishap is the first fatal POW mishap of FY21.

Reinforce to your Soldiers that alcohol and weapons should never be mixed along with the need to always THINK about weapons safety:
Treat every weapon as if it is loaded.
Handle every weapon with care.
Identify the target before you fire.
Never point the muzzle at anything you don’t intend to shoot.
Keep the weapon on safe and your finger off the trigger until you intend to fire.

 

 

PLR 21-015 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-4 mishap 13 November 2020 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at 2230 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle with another Soldier riding as a passenger when he ran off of the road and struck a tree. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene, while the passenger was transported to the local hospital with non-fatal injuries and is currently awaiting surgery. The hospitalized Soldier has a favorable prognosis; however, physicians assess the Soldier will lose their right eye. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, use of seat belts, and alcohol and drugs as contributing factors are unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the sixth PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
1. Greater potential for loss of vehicle control;
2. Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment;
3. Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger;
4. Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries;
5. Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.

How to be a better passenger:

-Share the responsibilities
Making yourself useful – whether you offer to operate the GPS or act as another set of eyes for the driver – can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue. Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task at hand.

-Banish backseat driving
Keeping a watchful eye for things the driver might miss is helpful; criticizing every move the driver makes could be harmful. If the driver gets frustrated or annoyed, the likelihood is they’ll pay less attention to the road, which could lead to an easily avoidable accident.

-Seat belts
Drilled into us since childhood, this one should be obvious but is worth repeating: wear your seat belt. It's the driver's legal responsibility to make sure passengers are properly belted.

 

 

PLR 21-016 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Quincy, Florida, died in a PMV-4 mishap 14 November 2020 in Live Oak, Florida, at 1900 local. A Soldier was driving his private motor vehicle with two other Soldiers as passengers, returning to home station from IDT weapons qualification. According to the Florida Highway Patrol lead investigator, the Soldiers' vehicle was rear-ended by a drunk driver, resulting in both vehicles going off the road. One Soldier was ejected from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier driving was flown to a local health center, where he is listed in critical condition. The other Soldier was transported to a local health center in stable condition with a contusion on his lung, then transported to the university medical center for further evaluation and treatment. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, seat belt use, and alcohol and drugs as a contributing factor, are unknown at this time. The Florida Highway Patrol and Florida Army National Guard State Safety Office are conducting an ongoing investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the seventh PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

1. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.
2. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
4. Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving.
5. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
6. Maintain the posted speed limit.
7. Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

 

 

PLR 21-013 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Whiteman Armory, Missouri, died in a PMV-2 mishap 6 November 2020 in Springfield, Missouri, at 0330 local. At this time, it is unknown if the Soldier was the operator or passenger. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, use of personal protective equipment, completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors are currently unknown. The safety point of contact is waiting for local authorities to release additional information.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the sixth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

 

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