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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-036 - On-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation, Workplace
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Stewart, Georgia, died in an on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishap occurring 22 April 2022, on the installation. The Soldier was conducting a lap swim as part of pool duty certification when he submerged and did not resurface. Class lifeguards pulled the Soldier from underwater and identified a bleeding head injury and no detectable heartbeat. A lifeguard administered CPR until emergency medical services personnel arrived. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital, where he was treated for cardiac arrest and drowning. He was subsequently medically evacuated to a hospital in Savannah, where he was placed on life support. The Soldier was removed from life support three days later following organ donation.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of one Soldier a year to on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the second on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishap of FY22.


Safety is the first concern when training Soldiers in and around water. The following factors are important:

·Know the swimming ability level of each Soldier.
·Monitor Soldiers for overexertion and fatigue.
·Encourage Soldiers to communicate symptoms of overexertion and fatigue.
·Ensure instructors/lifeguards are properly trained and certified.
·Make sure appropriate safety equipment is serviceable and on-site.
·Use the buddy system. (Pair a strong swimmer with a weaker one)
·Have safety and emergency action plans in place and verify all participants understand them.

 

PLR 22-034 - GMV Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation, Workplace
A 20-year-old Private First Class assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in a GMV mishap 25 April 2022 at the Yakima Training Center (YTC), Washington, at approximately 0540 local. The unit was executing a four-vehicle convoy, as the convoy moved down a hill, when the driver of an M1083 lost control of the vehicle resulting in the vehicle rolling several times. County and YTC emergency services, installation range control, and the U.S. Army Air Ambulance Detachment responded. Upon arrival, one Soldier was pronounced dead and two others were medevac'd to Yakima Memorial Hospital. The U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center is leading a safety investigation into the mishap.

Since 2017, the Army has experienced an average of 10 GMV fatalities per year. This was the third GMV fatality of FY22 and above the number of GMV fatalities during the same time period last year.


Safety Tips:
-When approaching a steep hill or slope the driver must adjust the vehicle speed to allow a "Speed Cushion" for maneuvering. Drivers should come to a complete stop and downshift to a lower transmission gear range enabling the engine to become a braking action that helps control vehicle speed.

-If the vehicle begins to skid due to a slippery surface, apply moderate acceleration, reduce speed, apply moderate brake pressure, and make no quick or fast turns.

-Drivers of large vehicles will require additional space ahead of the vehicles in front. If the vehicle ahead should slow or stop, you will need more distance to stop your vehicle. As a general rule, you need at least one second for every 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds up to 40 mph. At higher speeds, you must add an additional second for every 10 feet.

-Ensure drivers have been properly trained and licensed on the vehicle they are operating and that they receive convoy training IAW ATP 4-11, to address the concerns of high center-of-gravity, high ground pressure, large size tires, and reduced visibility associated with Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles and other large vehicles.

-Ensuring vehicle seat belts are used to provide the ability to remain restrained to a stable surface is an essential component of safety and survival. Seat belts should be worn at all times and enforced by leadership as a tactical discipline.

 

PLR 22-019 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in an off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap 16 January 2022 in Lake Desoto, Hot Springs, Arkansas, at 1914 local. The Soldier and his fiancée fell into the river when their kayak capsized. A nearby boater heard screams for help and immediately responded. The boater rescued the fiancée but was unable to locate the Soldier. First responders from the Department of Natural Resources initiated search-and-rescue efforts with negative results. Those efforts transitioned to search and recovery due to the length of time the Soldier had been missing. His body was recovered two days later.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of 12 Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the first fatal off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY22.

Safety Tips:

• WEAR YOUR PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICE. Coast Guard regulations require that all kayaks have a lifejacket on board. Wearing your lifejacket will help keep your head above water and add insulation to your body, keeping you warmer in cold water. There are great PFDs designed specifically for paddlers. Buy one that fits well, and always wear it while you paddle.
• Be aware of weather conditions and water temperature. Prepare for changes in weather and the possibility of capsizing. If paddling in cold water, a wet suit or dry suit can keep you warm and comfortable. In warm weather, a long sleeve shirt can provide sun protection.
• Beware of off-shore winds that make it difficult to return to shore.
• Always follow the boating rules of the area you're kayaking.
• Never mix alcohol or drugs (prescription or non-prescription) with kayaking.
• Never exceed the weight capacity of your kayak and always check your equipment for wear and tear before you paddle.
• Seek qualified instruction to learn proper paddling techniques, water safety and basic first aid.
• Brush up on self-rescue first in calm, warm, shallow water, and again in more extreme conditions.
• Tell someone your paddle plan, which includes where you are going, what you will be doing, how long you expect to be gone and how many people are in your party. Then stick to your plan.
• Paddling in the surf zone or in rivers can be dangerous. Always wear a helmet.
• Stay hydrated. Always bring plenty of water and food.
• When paddling in a new area, check with the locals regarding currents, shoreline conditions and weather patterns. Plan an "escape" route — an alternative place to get off the water should environmental conditions dictate it.

For more info, visit https://www.oceankayak.com/blog/article/basic-safety-tips-kayaking.

 

PLR 21-091 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fairbanks, Alaska, died in a sports, recreation and physical training mishap 12 August 2021 in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve at 1200 local. This mishap was unobserved and the information is based on details received. The Soldier had been missing since 12 August, but was not scheduled to return until 20 August. His last known inReach message indicated he was crossing Jacksina Creek to access a hunting area. On 16 August, National Park Service (NPS) rangers were notified by the mishap Soldier’s point of contact that he had stopped checking in as pre-arranged. On 17 August, the NPS deployed search teams, and Alaska Wildlife Troopers initiated scans of the area. Helicopters, fixed-wing aircraft and ground teams searched the area. On 21 August at 1430 the Soldier was found dead alongside Jacksina Creek. Based on evidence found by searchers, it appears that the Soldier attempted to cross Jacksina Creek and was swept away by the current. His body was recovered and transported to the state medical examiner's office.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of 12 Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the eighth fatal off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY21.

 

 

PLR 21-083 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Benning, Georgia, died in a sports, recreation and physical training mishap in Lacey, Washington, 12 July 2021 at 1500 local. The Soldier was kayaking alone on Hicks Lake when the kayak overturned. An unknown person reported the Soldier’s overturned kayak to the Lacey Police Department (LPD). The LPD searched the shoreline, reviewed surveillance video and conducted a shallow-water dive, but were unsuccessful in locating the Soldier. His body was found the following day by the LPD during a deep-water search operation. Specific circumstances of the mishap, including alcohol/drugs as contributing factors and/or if other Soldiers were present, are unknown.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of 12 Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the seventh fatal off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY21.


Water Safety Tips:

Wear a kayaking-specific life jacket at all times – No excuses! Regardless of your swimming abilities or kayaking skill level, wearing a well-fitting, properly maintained and suitable buoyancy aid could save your life.

Never drink alcohol and paddle - Alcohol is a depressant; it slows your response times, impairs decision-making and negatively affects coordination.

Always wear appropriate clothing for the conditions (and your needs) - When deciding what to wear for a kayaking trip, you must take into account the time of year, water temperature and weather conditions. Clothing should be able to provide protection from the sun, wind and other elements.

Don’t go solo - A buddy rescue is faster than a self-rescue, and there’s no such thing as a self-tow if you’re hurt

Always tell someone where you are going and when you will be back - They can notify the Coast Guard or other rescue organization if you fail to check in according to the plan.

Learn basic kayaking safety skills - A class will teach the basics such as how to brace in rough water; what equipment is needed for river versus lake kayaking or ocean paddling; essential paddle techniques; and the fundamentals of how to roll a kayak.

 

 

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