X

Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

Learn more: FAQs   |   Subscribe to receive PLRs via email | Unsubscribe   |   Put the PLR Feed on your website.

PLR 18-061 - Pedestrian Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Pedestrian
A Corporal assigned to U.S. Army Reserve Command died in a pedestrian mishap 5 April 2018 in Orlando, Florida, at 0230 local. The Soldier was in battle assembly/drill status when he was struck by a vehicle as he crossed an intersection on foot.

PLR 18-055 - Pedestrian Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Pedestrian
A 31-year-old Captain assigned to 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a pedestrian mishap 24 March 2018 in Colorado Springs at 0221 local. The Soldier was suspected to have been sitting on or near railroad tracks when he was struck by a passing train.

ENGAGEMENT TIPS:

  • All train tracks are private property. Never walk or sit on tracks; it's illegal trespass and highly dangerous. By the time a locomotive engineer sees a trespasser or vehicle on the tracks, it's too late. It takes the average freight train traveling at 55 mph more than a mile—the length of 18 football fields—to stop. Trains cannot stop quickly enough to avoid a collision.

  • Remember to cross train tracks only at designated pedestrian or roadway crossings, and obey all warning signs and signals posted there.

  • Stay alert around railroad tracks. No texting, headphones or other distractions that would prevent you from hearing an approaching train; never mix rails and recreation.


PLR 18-039 - Pedestrian Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Pedestrian
A First Sergeant assigned to 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, and attached to U.S. Army Europe, died in a pedestrian mishap 5 February 2018 in Parsberg, Germany, at 0130 local. The Soldier was struck by a train while walking near the station.

  • All train tracks are private property. Never walk on tracks; it's illegal trespass and highly dangerous. By the time a locomotive engineer sees a trespasser or vehicle on the tracks, it's too late. It takes the average freight train traveling at 55 mph more than a mile—the length of 18 football fields—to stop. Trains cannot stop quickly enough to avoid a collision.

  • Remember to cross train tracks only at designated pedestrian or roadway crossings, and obey all warning signs and signals posted there.

  • Stay alert around railroad tracks. No texting, headphones or other distractions that would prevent you from hearing an approaching train; never mix rails and recreation.

PLR 18-018 - Pedestrian Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Pedestrian
A Sergeant assigned to Eighth Army, Suwon Air Base, Republic of Korea, died in a pedestrian mishap 7 December 2017 at 2315 local near Suwon, Korea. The Soldier’s unit was conducting convoy operations when his Army Motor Vehicle was involved in an accident. In an attempt to emplace warning triangles, the Soldier exited the AMV and was struck by a civilian vehicle. He was ground evacuated to a local hospital, where he was later pronounced dead.

ENGAGEMENT TIPS:

If you are involved in a vehicle accident or other roadside emergency:

  • Pull over and out of traffic if possible. Even if all of the emergency lights are activated, some highway drivers do not pay close attention and could rear-end the disabled vehicle, causing further damage or injury.

  • If you must exit the vehicle, do so safely and well away from oncoming traffic and your vehicle.

  • If possible, you and any passengers should exit through the side of the vehicle facing away from the road.

  • Not only do you need to stay out of the roadway, you need to put as much distance as possible between you and the disabled vehicle until traffic has been diverted around it.

ANALYZE IT: https://safety.army.mil/ShrinkLink/163

TRAIN IT: https://safety.army.mil/OFF-DUTY/Pedestrian.aspx

PLR 18-008 - Pedestrian Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Pedestrian
A Specialist assigned to U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command, with duty at Landstuhl, Germany, died 9 October 2017 at 0620 local in Landstuhl. The Soldier is believed to have been walking on or along railroad tracks when he was struck by a passing train.

ENGAGEMENT TIPS:

  • All train tracks are private property. Never walk on tracks; it’s illegal trespass and highly dangerous. By the time a locomotive engineer sees a trespasser or vehicle on the tracks it’s too late. It takes the average freight train traveling at 55 mph more than a mile — the length of 18 football fields — to stop. Trains cannot stop quickly enough to avoid a collision.

  • Remember to cross train tracks only at designated pedestrian or roadway crossings, and obey all warning signs and signals posted there.

  • Stay alert around railroad tracks. No texting, headphones or other distractions that would prevent you from hearing an approaching train. Never mix rails and recreation.

ANALYZE IT: https://safety.army.mil/ShrinkLink/163

TRAIN IT: https://safety.army.mil/ShrinkLink/167

1234