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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-010 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Benning, Georgia, died in a PMV-4 mishap 11 November 2020 in Phenix City, Alabama, at 1800 local. Military police were notified by a third party of an undetermined manner of death involving a two-vehicle accident. The unit contacted the Phenix City Police Department, which confirmed a fatal traffic accident involving a Soldier. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier’s wife was also involved in the accident and remains in stable condition at a local hospital, where she is in a medically induced coma following surgery. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, seat belt use, alcohol or drugs, are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the fifth PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

-Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

-Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.

-Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.

-Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving.

-Focus as far to your front as possible, using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.

-Maintain the posted speed limit.

-Always wear your seat belt and ensure passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 21-009 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims Two Soldiers' Lives

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, died in a PMV-4 mishap 8 November 2020 in Oahu, Hawaii, at 0050 local. The Soldier was traveling eastbound at a high rate of speed when he lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a utility pole, coming to rest against a tree. No other vehicles were involved. He and the Soldier riding as a passenger were pronounced dead at the scene. Local law enforcement reported that speed was an apparent factor. It is currently unknown if seat belts were worn or if drugs or alcohol were also factors.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the third PMV-4 mishap of the year and resulted in the third and fourth fatalities of FY21.

For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2017, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

Speed also affects your safety even when you are driving at the speed limit but too fast for road conditions, such as during bad weather, when a road is under repair or in an area at night that isn’t well lit.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging, including:

-Greater potential for loss of vehicle control.

-Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment.

-Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger.

-Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries.

-Economic implications of a speed-related crash.

-Increased fuel consumption/cost.

 

 

PLR 21-003 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Private assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 9 October 2020 in Clarksville, Tennessee, at 0218 local. The Soldier was riding as a passenger in a private motor vehicle that ran a red light and was struck by a fuel tanker truck. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier was wearing his seat belt. Speed and alcohol use are unknown at this time. This mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the first off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

How to be a better passenger:
Making yourself useful – whether you offer to operate the GPS or act as another set of eyes for the driver – can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue.
Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task at hand.
Keeping a watchful eye for things the driver might miss is helpful; criticizing every move the driver makes could be harmful. If the driver gets frustrated or annoyed, it’s likely they’ll pay less attention to the road, which could lead to an easily avoidable accident.

Reminders while on the road:
1.Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2.Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3.Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
4.Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
5.Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
6.Maintain the posted speed limit.
7.Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 


PLR 20-089 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 21-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Wainwright, Alaska, died in a PMV-4 mishap 29 September 2020 in North Pole, Alaska, at 1654. The Soldier was operating his vehicle, when he was involved in a collision with another non-military vehicle. Emergency personnel evacuated the Soldier via ambulance to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead by the attending physician. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of seat belt and speed as a factor, are unknown at this time. Initial reports reflect that the use of alcohol does not appear to be a factor. State Troopers are investigating the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 29TH PMV-4 fatality of FY20 but below the number of similar fatalities during the same time period last year.

Here are important safety tips to focus on while driving:
1. Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
4. Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
5. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
6. Maintain the posted speed limit.
7. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 20-082 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in a PMV-4 mishap 6 September 2020 in Lakewood, Washington, at 2200 local. The Soldier was driving his vehicle when he struck a light pole. The damage was substantial enough that emergency responders had to use a mechanical extraction device to remove him from the vehicle. The Soldier was transported to the local medical center for surgery and died the following morning. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including seat belt use, speed, and alcohol and drug involvement, are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 28th off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY20 and below the number of similar fatalities during the same time period last year.

Speeding endangers everyone on the road: In 2018, speeding killed 9,378 people. We all know the frustrations of modern life and juggling a busy schedule, but speed limits are put in place to protect all road users.

Speeding endangers everyone on the road: In 2018, speeding killed 9,378 people. We all know the frustrations of modern life and juggling a busy schedule, but speed limits are put in place to protect all road users.

For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2017, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

Speed also affects your safety even when you are driving at the speed limit but too fast for road conditions, such as during bad weather, when a road is under repair, or in an area at night that isn’t well lit.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:

•Greater potential for loss of vehicle control
•Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment
•Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger
•Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries
•Economic implications of a speed-related crash
•Increased fuel consumption/cost.

 

 

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