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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-025 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Drum, New York, died in a PMV-4 mishap 3 January 2021 in Ceres Township, Pennsylvania, at 0145 local. The Soldier was a passenger in a vehicle that crashed when the driver took a left-hand curve at a high rate of speed and struck a concrete barrier, ejecting the Soldier. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver was transported to the hospital with minor injuries. The Soldier was reportedly not wearing a seat belt during the mishap. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 13th PMV-4 fatality of FY21


Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
- Greater potential for loss of vehicle control;
- Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment;
- Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger;
- Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries;
- Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.

How to be a better passenger

Share the responsibilities:
Making yourself useful – whether you offer to operate the navigation system or act as another set of eyes for the driver – you can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue. Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task at hand. If you feel the driver is doing something unsafe, say something. As a passenger, you’re letting the driver gamble with your life and the lives of your family and friends. Be a better passenger and protect your life and the life of the driver.

 

 

PLR 21-024 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-4 mishap 23 December 2020 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at 1752 local. The Soldier was allegedly driving on the highway at a high rate of speed when another motorist merged into his lane, striking his vehicle. The Soldier’s vehicle flipped and hit a pole. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier was wearing a seat belt, and alcohol use is not suspected. The mishap is under investigation by the Colorado Springs Police Department.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 12th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
- Greater potential for loss of vehicle control
- Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment
- Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger
- Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries
- Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.
- For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2017, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

 

 

PLR 21-023 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-4 mishap 23 December 2020 in Oklaunion,
Texas, at 1630 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle on a highway when he entered the center median and overcorrected, causing his vehicle to skid across the road. The vehicle entered a ditch and rolled several times, ejecting the Soldier. The Soldier’s wife, who was riding as passenger, was extracted and transported by emergency medical services to the local hospital with serious injuries. The Soldier was reportedly not wearing his seat belt. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed as a contributing factor, are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the
11th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


1. Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3. Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
4. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
5. Maintain the posted speed limit.
6. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.
7. If you veer off the road, do not panic. Gradually reduce your speed, look in the direction you want to go and slowly steer back onto the roadway while watching for traffic.

 

 

PLR 21-022 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 18 December 2020 in Georgetown, Texas, at 0500 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle on the highway when he was hit head on by a civilian driving on the wrong side of the road. The collision caused the Soldier's vehicle to rollover causing him to sustain injuries to his head and left leg. Emergency Medical Services arrived on scene and extracted the Soldier from the vehicle. According to authorities on the scene, alcohol was suspected on the part of the civilian driver. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead by the local Justice of the Peace.

The Soldier was reportedly wearing his seatbelt. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed and alcohol as a contributing factor on the Soldier’s part, are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the tenth PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

 

 

PLR 21-021 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to the Nevada Army National Guard died in a PMV-4 mishap 14 December 2020 in Reno, Nevada, at 0735 local. The Soldier was on active duty, attending a five-day training course. While en route to the first day of training, his vehicle was involved in a mishap with a school bus. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene by the local police. He was reportedly wearing his seat belt. Specific circumstances are unknown at this time; however, there were reports of black ice conditions at the time of the mishap. The Reno Police Department and Nevada Army National Guard State Safety Office are conducting an ongoing investigation.
Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the ninth PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions

Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. Remember that your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

-Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
-Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
-Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
-Maintain the posted speed limit.
-Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.
-Put down your phone. Smartphones and handheld electronic devices are a daily part of life, but they take your eyes off of the road and distract your attention.

 

 


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