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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-082 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
An Army Reserve Private First Class on active duty for training, assigned to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, died in a PMV-4 mishap 23 July 2021 in Bourbon, Missouri, at 1654 local. The Soldier’s eastbound vehicle was struck head-on by a westbound civilian truck that crossed an interstate median after a malfunction. The Soldier’s vehicle was then struck from the rear by another civilian vehicle. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene along with his two passengers. It is unknown at this time if speed or alcohol were factors. This mishap is still under investigation by the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off–duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 33rd PMV-4 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions:

Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. Remember your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

-Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
-Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
-Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
-Focus as far to your front as possible, using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
-Maintain the posted speed limit.
-Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 21-076 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Private assigned to Fort Benning, Georgia, died in a PMV-4 mishap 5 July 2021 in Hamilton County, Tennessee. At approximately 0800, the Tennessee Highway Patrol responded to a single-vehicle accident on I-75. Emergency medical service personnel arrived and pronounced the Soldier dead at the scene at 0810. The Soldier was positively identified by his military ID and driver’s license. He was transported to the local county medical examiner’s office for an autopsy. Initial reports state the cause of the mishap was a tire from another vehicle breaking free and striking the Soldier’s vehicle. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their report.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 32nd PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


Six Common Obstacles on the Roadway and Tips to Avoid Them:

1. A Deer in the Headlights:
The number of drivers involved in accidents caused by deer on the roadways is growing every single year. As we humans spread into previously uninhabited forests, wildlife such as deer are bound to be found meandering down roads. Surprisingly, many accidents involving deer take place in suburban areas and small towns. Don’t think that you are safe from the deer dilemma just because you live miles from anything rural. Watch out for deer on a blind curve. The danger of colliding with a deer is heightened in the early hours of morning and the hours surrounding sunset, these times being most popular for deer to be mobile. If you see a deer on the road ahead, slow down as much as possible. If you are already very close to the animal when you notice it, do not slam on your brakes. This may cause your vehicle to skid or the car behind you to rear-end your vehicle. Instead, firmly grip the steering wheel and brace yourself for the impact. If you hit the animal, pull over as soon as you can to check for any damage to your car and recover from the collision. If the animal is still alive, you may need to call local law enforcement for assistance.

2. UFOs on the Roads:
Unidentified flying objects are common occurrences on roadways, particularly highways and interstates where vehicles travel at high speeds. Imagine you are enjoying your pleasant commute when something unexpectedly flies toward your windshield. Whether it is a bag of garbage, piece of lumber, 12-foot ladder, fast food bag, or large bird, these random objects are cause for panic in many drivers. When you are driving at high speeds, even something as harmless as an empty grocery bag can startle you as it flies toward your windshield. Do you best to remain calm if you suddenly see something coming toward your vehicle. If you identify the object as dangerous, such as a large limb or piece of metal, quickly evaluate the traffic around you, then make an attempt to avoid the object if it is safe to do so. If a large object is lying on the road, try to steer your vehicle so that your wheels straddle it as you pass. If something hits your car and you suspect damage has occurred, pull over as soon as possible and call local law enforcement to file an accident report.

3. SMVs:
Slow-moving vehicles are an official category of vehicles that can be found on many types of roadways. An SMV is any type of vehicle that is not able to travel over a particular speed. In most states, this speed is 30 mph. You never know what type of SMV you can bump into. While these vehicles are not allowed on interstate highways, they are legally allowed to travel on all other roadways, so it is likely that you will encounter an SMV from time to time. Some examples of SMVs include: horse-drawn carriages in cities, tractors or farm equipment, vehicles used for road construction and maintenance, golf carts or small electronic passenger vehicles, mowers and wagons used as transportation by some cultural groups. All SMVs are required to display a bright-orange reflective triangle outlined in dark red to warn drivers that they travel at slow speeds. If you encounter an SMV, make sure to maintain a safe distance, especially if the vehicle is being powered by livestock. Most SMVs will allow traffic to pass them from time to time.

4. Speed Bumps:
Although it is widely accepted by automobile safety experts that speed bumps save lives by warning drivers to slow down, many consider them to be a nuisance. If you see a speed bump ahead, slow your vehicle considerably before you reach it to prevent being jostled and your car from sustaining damage.

5. Pedestrians:
People are the most important obstacle to avoid. Make sure that you watch out for pedestrians at all times, not only when you are driving over a marked crosswalk. Always yield right of way to pedestrians. Wait until they have completely cleared the road before continuing.

6. Pets:
Especially in suburban areas or on neighborhood streets, dogs and cats can be common obstacles. While you should never put yourself in danger of having a wreck to avoid hitting someone’s pet, there are several measures that drivers can take to avoid hitting beloved dogs and cats. First, slow down in these areas. Where there are freely roaming pets, there are often people. Drivers should watch out for both. Also, periodically scan either side of neighborhood streets for approaching animals. If you do make contact with a pet, it is common courtesy to assist the animal and make every effort to contact its owner.

Remember that you are never driving your vehicle in a bubble. There are all kinds of obstacles that can appear in your path and you must be prepared to navigate them. Obeying the posted speed limit and staying alert while driving will go a long way in preventing your vehicle from making contact with any of these common obstacles.

(Source: https://driving-tests.org/beginner-drivers/how-to-avoid-obstacles-on-the-roadway/)

 

 

PLR 21-072 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 2 July 2021 in Fall Branch, Tennessee, at 0100 local. The Tennessee Highway Patrol responded to the single-vehicle mishap, and emergency medical services personnel pronounced the Soldier dead at the scene. He was positively identified by his driver’s license and rental vehicle documents. The safety/unit points of contact are awaiting for the local law enforcement to release their report. Specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed as a contributing factor, are unknown at this time. It was reported that alcohol/drugs were not involved.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 31st PMV-4 fatality of FY21.



According to the National Sleep Foundation, about half of U.S. adult drivers admit to consistently getting behind the wheel while feeling drowsy. About 20% admit to falling asleep behind the wheel at some point in the past year – with more than 40% admitting this has happened at least once in their driving careers.

These startling figures show how prevalent drowsy driving is. What drivers may not realize is how much drowsy driving puts themselves – and others – at risk.


Driving while drowsy is similar to driving under the influence of alcohol:

•Drivers’ reaction times, awareness of hazards and ability to sustain attention all worsen the drowsier the driver is.

•Driving after going more than 20 hours without sleep is the equivalent of driving with a blood-alcohol concentration of .08% – the U.S. legal limit.

•You are three times more likely to be in a car crash if you are fatigued.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, every year about 100,000 police-reported crashes involve drowsy driving. These crashes result in more than 1,550 fatalities and 71,000 injuries. The real number may be much higher, however, as it is difficult to determine whether a driver was drowsy at the time of a crash.

A study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimated that 328,000 drowsy driving crashes occur annually. That's more than three times the police-reported number. The same study found that 109,000 of those drowsy driving crashes resulted in an injury and about 6,400 were fatal. The researchers suggest the prevalence of drowsy driving fatalities is more than 350% greater than reported.

Beyond the human toll is the economic one. NHTSA estimates fatigue-related crashes resulting in injury or death cost society $109 billion annually, not including property damage.



Interventions for Drowsy Driving

Drowsy driving affects everyone, but especially those under age 25, who make up an estimated 50% or more of drowsy driving crashes.

That means interventions focusing on this age group – males especially – can help reduce drowsy driving among those vulnerable. One such intervention is for parents to incorporate discussions and rules on drowsy driving while completing their parent-teen driving agreements.

Other ways to reduce drowsy driving include:

•Crash avoidance technologies: New and existing safety technologies, such as drowsiness alert and lane departure warnings, can detect common drowsy driving patterns and warn drivers to stay in their lane or take a break

•Getting more sleep: According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society, adults should get seven or more hours of sleep each night

•Medication labels: A 2015 article by Consumer Reports found that side effects warnings are not always clear; new labeling guidelines may help drivers understand when to drive or not drive after taking these medications.

•Employers: Workplaces with strong off-the-job safety and health programs can include key information on getting sufficient sleep and refraining from driving drowsy.

 

 

PLR 21-066 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 4 June 2021 in Carroll County, Tennessee, at 0115 local. The Soldier was en route to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, when he was involved in a traffic accident. He sustained serious injuries and was taken to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The circumstances of the mishap are unknown at this time and it remains under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 30th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


According to the National Sleep Foundation, about half of U.S. adult drivers admit to consistently getting behind the wheel while feeling drowsy. About 20% admit to falling asleep behind the wheel at some point in the past year – with more than 40% admitting this has happened at least once in their driving careers.
These startling figures show how prevalent drowsy driving is. What drivers may not realize is how much drowsy driving puts themselves – and others – at risk.
Driving while drowsy is similar to driving under the influence of alcohol:

•Drivers’ reaction times, awareness of hazards and ability to sustain attention all worsen the drowsier the driver is.

•Driving after going more than 20 hours without sleep is the equivalent of driving with a blood-alcohol concentration of .08% – the U.S. legal limit.

•You are three times more likely to be in a car crash if you are fatigued.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, every year about 100,000 police-reported crashes involve drowsy driving. These crashes result in more than 1,550 fatalities and 71,000 injuries. The real number may be much higher, however, as it is difficult to determine whether a driver was drowsy at the time of a crash.

A study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimated that 328,000 drowsy driving crashes occur annually. That's more than three times the police-reported number. The same study found that 109,000 of those drowsy driving crashes resulted in an injury and about 6,400 were fatal. The researchers suggest the prevalence of drowsy driving fatalities is more than 350% greater than reported.

Beyond the human toll is the economic one. NHTSA estimates fatigue-related crashes resulting in injury or death cost society $109 billion annually, not including property damage.


Interventions for Drowsy Driving

Drowsy driving affects everyone, especially those under age 25, who make up an estimated 50% or more of drowsy driving crashes.
That means interventions focusing on this age group – males especially – can help reduce drowsy driving among those vulnerable. One such intervention is for parents to incorporate discussions and rules on drowsy driving while completing their parent-teen driving agreements.
Other ways to reduce drowsy driving include:

•Crash avoidance technologies: New and existing safety technologies, such as drowsiness alert and lane departure warnings, can detect common drowsy driving patterns and warn drivers to stay in their lane or take a break.

•Getting more sleep: According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society, adults should get seven or more hours of sleep each night.

•Medication labels: A 2015 article by Consumer Reports found that side effects warnings are not always clear; new labeling guidelines may help drivers understand when to drive or not drive after taking these medications.

•Employers: Workplaces with strong off-the-job safety and health programs can include key information on getting sufficient sleep and refraining from driving drowsy.

 

 

PLR 21-064 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Warrant Officer assigned to Grafenwoehr, Germany, died in a PMV-4 mishap 16 May 2021 in Bavaria, Germany, at 2040 local. The Soldier was driving when he attempted to pass another vehicle, struck the center dividing barrier and was ejected. Polizei transported the Soldier to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. It is unknown who contacted the local authorities and emergency management services, but polizei notified military police. Alcohol reportedly was not a causal factor in the mishap; however, it is unknown if speed and seat belt use contributed. The safety point of contact is awaiting for the local polizei to release their report.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 29th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.



Driving on the autobahn has its own unique customs and rules.

Speed: On the autobahn, you can drive as fast as you feel is safe (unless otherwise marked); the German authorities recommend a "suggested" speed of 130 kph (80 mph). There is no speed limit on the autobahn, except where posted. For example, speed limits are posted in construction zones or in high-traffic areas, so watch out for these signs — you can get a hefty ticket for speeding in restricted areas on the autobahn.

Passing: You can only pass another car in the left lane. The right lane is for slower vehicles, and overtaking cars in the right lane is illegal. Unlike in the United States, this is strictly enforced.

Look carefully: Before you pull into the left lane to pass another car, make sure to check the rearview mirror carefully. Some cars travel as fast as 200 kph and approach very suddenly. If a car flashes its lights as it approaches from the rear, it means "get out of the way," and you should move to the right.

Top tips for driving Germany’s autobahns

1. Stay on the right except when passing or in heavy congestion.
2. Pay attention to the signs. It’s as easy to miss a reduced speed limit sign as it is to miss an end of speed limit sign.
3. Sundays are the best days for driving on the autobahn since most trucks aren’t allowed on the road.
4. Fridays are the heaviest traffic days, especially before holidays. Try to avoid driving around metropolitan areas between typical rush hours (0700-1000 and 1500-1800).
5. Drive like a local as much as possible. This doesn’t just mean to drive fast and very close to the car in front of you. It means paying close attention to the road and other vehicles. This is what the locals are doing.
6. Don’t allow distractions like texts, phone calls, fiddling with gadgets (GPS, DVD, radio, etc.) while driving at speed. A half a second covers way more ground at 200 kph than at 100 kph.
7. Don’t stay in the left lane any longer than you need to pass slower traffic.
8. If someone flashes their high beams at you from behind, don’t get upset. Just finish passing and move over to the right when done and clear the lane for them.

 

 

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