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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 20-079 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Chief Warrant Officer 3 assigned to Fort Wainwright, Alaska, died in a PMV-4 mishap 5 September 2020 in Fairbanks, Alaska, at 0330 local. The Soldier was driving his PMV-4 with a civilian passenger northbound when he struck the curb approximately 1,100 feet from a traffic-light-controlled intersection. The impact launched the vehicle 25 feet before striking the ground and hitting a light standard. The light standard was tossed into the air and landed 540 feet north along the path of the Soldier’s moving vehicle. The vehicle continued for another 500 feet across the road, over a median and down an embankment into a water-filled slough. Another motorist that witnessed the mishap stopped and removed the occupants from the vehicle and began administering CPR on the Soldier. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. The civilian passenger was conscious and sustained non-fatal injuries. Alcohol was present, but it’s currently unknown whether it was a contributing factor. The use of seat belt and speed as a factor are also unknown. State troopers are investigating the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 27th off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY20 and is below the number of similar fatalities during the same time period last year.

Here are some important safety tips to follow when operating a vehicle:

- Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
- Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
- Maintain the posted speed limit.
- One of the most common things that may cause you to drift away from the center of your lane is if you’re looking down over the hood of the vehicle, focusing on things that are too close. You want to make sure you’re looking as far up the center of your intended path as you can, which generally means you’re looking at the horizon. What’s right in front of your vehicle (that you can see) is available to your peripheral vision. And your peripheral vision can alert you to a problem. Keep your focus far ahead, and you’ll still see what’s in front of your vehicle.

 

 

PLR 20-073 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 16 August 2020 in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, 1930 local. The Soldier was traveling on the Bluegrass Parkway when he attempted to make a U-turn and was struck by an oncoming vehicle. The Soldier’s use of seat belt has not been verified. Speed and alcohol use are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 26th PMV-4 fatality of FY20 and is below the number of similar fatalities during the same time period last year. Only make a legal U-turn if there is an unobstructed view of oncoming traffic. Speed limit, visibility, and the amount of space available to turn around are all factors you must consider before turning around in traffic. Sometimes, proceeding to the next exit, exiting and reentering the highway is your best choice.

 

 

PLR 20-063 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Recruiting Company Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, died in a PMV-4 mishap 30 June 2020 in Angola, New York, at 2238 local. The Soldier was involved in an accident with another motorist, which forced his vehicle to leave the roadway and strike a utility pole. He was electrocuted when his body came into contact with a power line. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 25th off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY20.

 

 

PLR 20-061 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 23-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 26 June 2020 in Sunnyvale, Texas, at 0230 local. The Soldier was riding as a passenger in a private motor vehicle when it was involved in a two-vehicle accident. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Seat belt use for the Soldier and the driver of the vehicle is unknown at this time; however, the driver is suspected of being under the influence of alcohol at the time of the mishap. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 24th off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY20. While the Army is below PMV-4 fatalities from this time last year, this is another example of how risk increases after midnight.

 

 

PLR 20-060 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 20 June 2020 in Trigg County, Kentucky, at 0430 local. The Soldier was riding as a passenger in another Soldier's private motor vehicle when the driver lost control in a turn, struck a tree causing the vehicle to rollover. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier who was operating the vehicle was taken into custody on multiple charges, including driving under the influence. Seat belt use is currently unknown. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 23rd off-duty PMV-4 fatality of FY20. The relaxation of COVID restrictions is exposing Soldiers to an increase in off-duty risks. What are you doing to prevent young Soldiers from driving under the influence at 0430 in the morning?

 

 

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