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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-062 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 19-year-old Private assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 23 July 2022 in Oldham County, Kentucky, at 1430 local. The Soldier was traveling northbound when he collided with two semi-trucks. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The circumstances surrounding the mishap are under investigation by local law enforcement and the Army Criminal Investigation Division.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 35 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 22nd PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

PLR 22-061 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky, died as a result of injuries from a PMV-2 mishap that occurred 14 June 2022 in Hardin County, Kentucky, at 2344 local. The Soldier was found lying in a field, presumably thrown from his motorcycle. Paramedics arrived on scene and immediately transported the Soldier to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead. It is currently unknown who notified authorities or if speed or alcohol was involved. The Soldier had completed the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training. This mishap is still under investigation by local law enforcement.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 21st off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.

 

PLR 22-060 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 24-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 18 June 2022 in El Paso, Texas, at 0030 local. The Soldier was a passenger traveling with another Soldier in his private motor vehicle when the driver lost control while navigating a curve at an intersection. The vehicle left the roadway, struck a light pole, and caught fire. Fire medical services arrived, extinguished the fire, and transported the Soldier to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead. The driver survived with burns. Other specific circumstances such as mishap sequence, speed, the involvement of alcohol or drugs, and the Soldier’s use of a seat belt are still unknown. This mishap is under investigation by local law enforcement.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 35 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 21st PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

PLR 22-059 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 26-year-old Private First Class assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-4 mishap 22 July 2022 in Augusta, Georgia, at 1840 local. Currently, only time and location of the mishap are known as the safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report. Other specific circumstances such as mishap sequence, speed, the involvement of alcohol or drugs, or the Soldier’s use of a seat belt are still unknown. It is also unknown who notified 911.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 35 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 20th PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

PLR 22-058 – PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 20-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas died in a PMV-4 mishap that occurred 17 July 2022 on the installation at 2100 local. As the driver turned into the battalion parking lot, the Soldier riding in the rear passenger seat attempted to sit on the door frame of the open window. As a result, the Soldier fell out of the window and struck his head on the pavement. Alcohol was involved but the driver was given a field sobriety test by law enforcement personnel and passed. The mishap Soldier was transported to the local university medical center for further treatment. The Soldier was placed in a medically induced coma, however, succumbed to his injuries four days later.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 19th PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Safety Tips For Pickup Truck Drivers | Driving Safe

Pickup trucks are versatile vehicles. They can easily be used for day-to-day errands and running around town, but they are also great for work because of the amount of equipment they can accommodate in the back. These powerful, heavy-duty vehicles help us haul, tow and get us where we need to be. But like any other tool of the trade, there are some important safety tips that should be observed.

PASSENGERS GO IN THE CAB BELTED UP – NOT THE BACK OR HANGING OUT THE WINDOW!

We’ve all seen images of pickup trucks travelling down a country road with people – often kids – blissfully riding along in the back. Some of us may even be guilty of doing this ourselves! But it’s time to put an end to this dangerous and illegal behavior.

Seat belts and airbags have been placed in modern vehicles for a reason – to protect the driver and passengers in case of an accident. The back of a pickup truck offers no such protection. Even a minor collision or large pothole, can toss a person out of the back of truck, causing injury or putting them into the path of another vehicle.

Key insights + statistics:
•Wearing your seat belt as a front-seat passenger can limit your chances of moderate to fatal injury by 50% and of dying by 45%. (NHTSA)
•Wearing your seat belt in a light truck limits your risk of critical injury by 60%. (AAA)
•Nationally, most (90.1%) of Americans use seat belts. (CDC)
•On average, 47% of people who die in car accidents weren’t wearing their seat belts. (IIHS)
•15,000 lives are saved every year by wearing a seat belt. (NHTSA)


How many people die from not wearing seat belts?

Unfortunately, the most recent accident fatality data is from 2017. In that year alone, of the 37,133 who died in car accidents, 17,452 people were not wearing a seat belt. With a mortality rate of 47% for those who choose not to, wearing a seat belt is absolutely critical to driver and passenger safety.

Horse play has no place when operating or riding in any vehicle this mishap proves you don’t have to be going fast to end up a fatality when alcohol is involved.


 

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