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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-026 - Combat Skills/Military Unique Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Other
A 24-year-old Trainee assigned to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, died in a combat skills/military unique mishap 3 March 2022 on the installation at 1520 local. After completing the Basic Combat Training introductory exercise “Hellcat 100,” the Trainee was conscious and semi-responsive but unstable on his feet. He lost consciousness while the battery drill sergeants performed heat casualty protocols. Emergency services was quickly notified, and the Trainee was transported to the local hospital. Lifesaving measures were performed and continued en route to the hospital. Upon arrival, he was pronounced dead by the attending physician.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of three Soldiers a year to combat skills/military-unique mishaps. This tragedy was the first combat skills/military unique fatality of FY22.

 

PLR 22-025 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A 27-year-old Staff Sergeant assigned to Tampa, Florida, died in a PMV-2 mishap 22 February 2022 in Winter Park, Florida, at 1530 local. Initial witness reports indicate the Soldier was traveling east when he swerved into the left turn lane to avoid stopped traffic. He then turned back into the through lane, lost control, hit a curb and drove into a restaurant parking lot. Florida State Troopers reported that the motorcycle struck the side of the building, ejecting the Soldier through the restaurant’s window, resulting in his fatal injuries. He was pronounced dead at the local hospital. The Soldier was wearing the required personal protective equipment and completed the mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation training. Alcohol or drugs as contributing factors are unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the Florida Highway Patrol to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 11th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.

In heavy traffic, slow down to allow for vehicles forced to make quick stops, leaving yourself plenty of room to maneuver. In general, assume drivers can't see you and act accordingly. Pay close attention to the vehicles around you, especially if you notice a driver isn't paying attention. Leave plenty of room (at least one car length) between you and the vehicle in front, giving you time to react if the driver brakes suddenly. Be on the lookout for other vehicles that may change lanes and veer into your path, and always signal and look behind you before changing lanes yourself.
The important thing is to leave yourself enough room to maneuver if something does go wrong.

When riding in heavy traffic, many motorcyclists prefer to ride in the far-left lane, leaving themselves one unobstructed side. Leave yourself enough room to maneuver if something does go wrong. Remember, if a car hits you, you are more likely to be injured than the driver, so it pays to err on the side of caution.
Splitting lanes (moving between vehicles in the space between lanes) is illegal in most states. Some studies suggest that lane-splitting in heavy traffic can reduce a rider's risk of being struck by another vehicle, particularly from behind when traffic is congested. Only split lanes if it is legal and be aware that this maneuver can sometimes aggravate drivers.

 

PLR 22-024 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A 23-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 12 February 2022 in El Paso, Texas, at 1600 local. The Soldier suffered fatal injuries when his motorcycle struck another vehicle. It is unknown who notified 911. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the sequence, speed, Soldier’s use of personal protective equipment, and involvement of alcohol or drugs, are also unknown. The Soldier completed Motorcycle Safety Foundation training in July 2021. There is no information on the name or status of the other individual involved in the mishap. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the El Paso Police Department to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 10th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.

 

PLR 22-023 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 5 February 2022 in Springfield, Tennessee, at 0420 local. The Soldier was traveling westbound on I-24 when he lost control of his vehicle and struck a tree. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the Soldier’s use of seat belt, speed, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are currently unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the eighth PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


According to the National Sleep Foundation, about half of U.S. adult drivers admit to consistently getting behind the wheel while feeling drowsy. About 20% admit to falling asleep behind the wheel at some point in the past year – with more than 40% admitting this has happened at least once in their driving careers.

These startling figures show how prevalent drowsy driving is. What drivers may not realize is how much drowsy driving puts themselves – and others – at risk. In fact, an estimated 5,000 people died in 2015 in crashes involving drowsy driving, according to a Governors Highway Safety Association report.

Driving while drowsy is similar to driving under influence of alcohol:

• Drivers’ reaction times, awareness of hazards and ability to sustain attention all worsen the drowsier the driver is.
• Driving after going more than 20 hours without sleep is the equivalent of driving with a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.08% – the U.S. legal limit.
• You are three times more likely to be in a car crash if you are fatigued.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, every year about 100,000 police-reported crashes involve drowsy driving. These crashes result in more than 1,550 fatalities and 71,000 injuries. The real number may be much higher, however, as it is difficult to determine whether a driver was drowsy at the time of a crash.

A study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimated that 328,000 drowsy driving crashes occur annually. That's more than three times the police-reported number. The same study found that 109,000 of those drowsy driving crashes resulted in an injury and about 6,400 were fatal. The researchers suggest the prevalence of drowsy driving fatalities is more than 350% greater than reported.

Beyond the human toll is the economic one. NHTSA estimates fatigue-related crashes resulting in injury or death cost society $109 billion annually, not including property damage.

Interventions for Drowsy Driving
Drowsy driving affects everyone, but especially those under age 25, who make up an estimated 50% or more of drowsy driving crashes.

That means interventions focusing on this age group – males especially – can help reduce drowsy driving among those vulnerable. One such intervention is for parents to incorporate discussions and rules on drowsy driving while completing their parent-teen driving agreements.

Ways to reduce drowsy driving include:
• Crash avoidance technologies: New and existing safety technologies, such as drowsiness alert and lane-departure warnings, can detect common drowsy driving patterns and warn drivers to stay in their lane or take a break.
• Getting more sleep: According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society, adults should get seven or more hours of sleep each night.
• Medication labels: A 2015 article by Consumer Reports found that side effects warnings are not always clear; new labeling guidelines may help drivers understand when to drive or not drive after taking these medications.
• Employers: Workplaces with strong off-the-job safety and health programs can include key information on getting sufficient sleep and refraining from driving drowsy

 

PLR 22-022 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2

An Army Reserve Specialist, activated under Title 10 orders, died in a PMV-2 mishap 3 February 2022 in Augusta, Georgia, at 0730 local. The Soldier was fatally injured while operating a motorcycle on a roadway. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the mishap sequence and if speed or alcohol were contributing factors, are currently unknown. The Soldier was wearing the required personal protective equipment, was properly licensed, and had completed the mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation training. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the ninth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.

 

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