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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-036 - On-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation, Workplace
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Stewart, Georgia, died in an on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishap occurring 22 April 2022, on the installation. The Soldier was conducting a lap swim as part of pool duty certification when he submerged and did not resurface. Class lifeguards pulled the Soldier from underwater and identified a bleeding head injury and no detectable heartbeat. A lifeguard administered CPR until emergency medical services personnel arrived. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital, where he was treated for cardiac arrest and drowning. He was subsequently medically evacuated to a hospital in Savannah, where he was placed on life support. The Soldier was removed from life support three days later following organ donation.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of one Soldier a year to on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the second on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishap of FY22.


Safety is the first concern when training Soldiers in and around water. The following factors are important:

·Know the swimming ability level of each Soldier.
·Monitor Soldiers for overexertion and fatigue.
·Encourage Soldiers to communicate symptoms of overexertion and fatigue.
·Ensure instructors/lifeguards are properly trained and certified.
·Make sure appropriate safety equipment is serviceable and on-site.
·Use the buddy system. (Pair a strong swimmer with a weaker one)
·Have safety and emergency action plans in place and verify all participants understand them.

 

PLR 22-035 - GMV Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Workplace
A 23-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a GMV mishap 28 April 2022 on the installation at 1154 local. The Soldier was ejected from a HMMWV that overturned. Three other Soldiers were also ejected and evacuated to a higher-level medical center. Their injuries are currently unknown. Initial reports indicate that the Soldiers were not wearing their seat belts. The mishap is under investigation by the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center.

Since 2017, the Army has experienced an average of 10 GMV fatalities per year. This was the fourth GMV fatality of FY22 and above the number of GMV fatalities during the same time period last year.


Wearing seat belts and following the posted speed limits not only apply off-duty but must also be enforced while on-duty. Safety while training is always a priority and requires leader involvement:

•Conduct reconnaissance of the route and terrain prior to a convoy. Ensure identified hazards (water crossings, bridges, complex terrain, etc.) are addressed with appropriate controls in the DRAW.
•Conduct mission-specific crew rehearsals.
•Ensure proper pre-combat checks and inspections are conducted.
•Ensure PMCS is conducted on equipment to include inspection and serviceability of restraint systems.
•Establish load plans for equipment and gear and verify equipment is loaded evenly for weight distribution.
•Ensure drivers are properly trained and licensed in accordance with Army Regulation 600-55, and pair individuals with limited driving experience with more experienced drivers.
•Follow and adhere to all posted speed limits and traffic caution signs. Include speed controls while corning or approaching a downslope in convoy briefs.
•Leadership oversight/enforcement is a must to ensure everyone knows and adheres to the standards.


 

PLR 22-034 - GMV Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation, Workplace
A 20-year-old Private First Class assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in a GMV mishap 25 April 2022 at the Yakima Training Center (YTC), Washington, at approximately 0540 local. The unit was executing a four-vehicle convoy, as the convoy moved down a hill, when the driver of an M1083 lost control of the vehicle resulting in the vehicle rolling several times. County and YTC emergency services, installation range control, and the U.S. Army Air Ambulance Detachment responded. Upon arrival, one Soldier was pronounced dead and two others were medevac'd to Yakima Memorial Hospital. The U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center is leading a safety investigation into the mishap.

Since 2017, the Army has experienced an average of 10 GMV fatalities per year. This was the third GMV fatality of FY22 and above the number of GMV fatalities during the same time period last year.


Safety Tips:
-When approaching a steep hill or slope the driver must adjust the vehicle speed to allow a "Speed Cushion" for maneuvering. Drivers should come to a complete stop and downshift to a lower transmission gear range enabling the engine to become a braking action that helps control vehicle speed.

-If the vehicle begins to skid due to a slippery surface, apply moderate acceleration, reduce speed, apply moderate brake pressure, and make no quick or fast turns.

-Drivers of large vehicles will require additional space ahead of the vehicles in front. If the vehicle ahead should slow or stop, you will need more distance to stop your vehicle. As a general rule, you need at least one second for every 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds up to 40 mph. At higher speeds, you must add an additional second for every 10 feet.

-Ensure drivers have been properly trained and licensed on the vehicle they are operating and that they receive convoy training IAW ATP 4-11, to address the concerns of high center-of-gravity, high ground pressure, large size tires, and reduced visibility associated with Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles and other large vehicles.

-Ensuring vehicle seat belts are used to provide the ability to remain restrained to a stable surface is an essential component of safety and survival. Seat belts should be worn at all times and enforced by leadership as a tactical discipline.

 

PLR 22-033 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 26-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 17 April 2022 in Dekalb County, Georgia, at 0315 local. The Soldier was attending U.S. Army Basic Airborne School, Fort Benning, Georgia, and had signed into school on 8 April 2022. He was involved in a vehicle mishap and sustained fatal injuries. Initial reports indicate he was wearing his seat belt. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the mishap sequence, speed, and the involvement of alcohol or drugs are currently unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the Dekalb County Sheriff’s Office to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 11th PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

PLR 22-032 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 16 April 2022 in El Paso, Texas, at 2352 local. The Soldier reportedly was attempting to change lanes at a high rate of speed by splitting between two vehicles on the roadway. He lost control, struck the rear of another vehicle, and was thrown onto landscaping rocks. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. It is unknown who notified 911. The Soldier was not wearing a helmet, and it is currently unknown if alcohol or drugs were involved. The Soldier completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse I (BRC-I) in May 2018: however, he did not complete the Advanced RiderCourse within 12 months of finishing the BRC-I. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 14th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.


Lane splitting occurs when a motorcyclist passes one or more vehicles between two lanes, often the area of the road where the road line is painted. It is also known as white-lining to seasoned motorcyclists. Typically, motorcyclists will use lane splitting to avoid stopping in heavy traffic.
Currently, “lane splitting” is only legal in seven states, and a state House bill is pending approval in an eighth. It is illegal in Texas.

The California Highway Patrol states the following and provides the general safety tips below:

“Although lane splitting is legal in California, motorcyclists are encouraged to exercise extreme caution when traveling between lanes of stopped or slow-moving traffic,” said CHP Commissioner Warren Stanley. “Every rider has the ultimate responsibility for their own decision-making and safety.”

These general safety tips are provided to assist you when riding; however, they are not guaranteed to keep you safe:
• Consider the total environment when you are lane splitting (this includes the width of lanes, the size of surrounding vehicles, as well as current roadway, weather, and lighting conditions).
• Danger increases at greater speed differentials.
• Danger increases as overall speed increases.
• It is typically safer to split between the far-left lanes than between the other lanes of traffic.
• Try to avoid lane splitting next to large vehicles (big rigs, buses, motorhomes, etc.).
• Riding on the shoulder is illegal; it is not considered lane splitting.
• Be visible – avoid remaining in the blind spots of other vehicles or lingering between vehicles.
• Help drivers see you by wearing brightly colored/reflective protective gear and using high beams during daylight hours.


 

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