X

Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

Learn more: FAQs   |   Subscribe to receive PLRs via email | Unsubscribe   |   Put the PLR Feed on your website.

PLR 21-042 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Private assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in an off-duty hiking mishap 16 March 2021 in Caldwell County, Kentucky at 1830 local. The Soldier and his girlfriend were hiking at a wildlife park, when they walked up to a common area known as Hunters Bluff to take pictures. When they reached the top, the Soldier tried to get close to the edge to take a picture, when he slipped on moss, and fell approximately 70 feet below. A civilian hiker witnessed the Soldier falling and provided medical attention. His girlfriend immediately called 911 and emergency medical services. A Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resource officer arrived on scene immediately after the Soldier fell. The Soldier was still alive but later died before paramedics could reach him.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of 14 Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the third fatal off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY21.


Hiking Tips:

-Use the buddy system. You and your companions should discuss a few things before you set out, like how strenuous a hike you're all okay with and your general itinerary.

-Make an emergency plan. Before heading out, know how you will call or send for help in the unlikely event something bad happens. Remember, you may not have reliable cell service where you are hiking.

-Drink and carry plenty of water (a minimum of one quart every two hours). Although stream, river and lake water may look clean, it can make you ill.

-Wear sturdy, comfortable shoes to help prevent injury.

-Don’t walk off-trail. Cutting across switchbacks erodes the hillside and eventually destroys the trail. Plus, walking off-trail increases your chance of suffering an injury or getting lost

-Tell a responsible person back at camp or at home where you are going and when you plan on returning. Ask that person to notify local law enforcement if you do not return on time.

-Never feed or touch wildlife. Do not approach or attempt to move sick or injured wildlife. Please report any encounters with aggressive, sick or injured animals to a park ranger.

 

 

PLR 21-039 - On-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Staff Sergeant assigned to the United States Army National Guard, Chattanooga, Tennessee, activated under Title 10 orders for training, died in an on-duty physical training mishap 10 March 2021 in Fort Bliss, Texas, at 2100 local. The Soldier was conducting physical training in the vicinity of the unit area, he began vomiting and requested medical assistance. Later, while exiting the latrine, he fell, striking his head on a metal crossbeam. Unit medics and physician assistant administered role 1 care on scene until emergency medical services arrived. The Soldier died en route to the hospital.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of one Soldier a year to on-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the first fatal on-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY21 and above the number of fatalities from this time last year.

 

 

PLR 21-019 Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a Sports, Recreation and Physical Training mishap 24 November 2020 on the installation. The Soldier was operating his dirt bike with his friend near the Fort Bragg training area. The friend left about 1430, while the Soldier continued riding. He was traveling east on a dirt road when he struck a tree. At approximately 2340, members of the Soldier’s platoon discovered his dirt bike. A special agent with the Criminal Investigation Division notified the platoon that a body was recovered and they were awaiting confirmation that it was the Soldier. The following morning, the Soldier’s battalion and company commander identified his body. This investigation is currently ongoing. Alcohol use is not suspected in the incident. Personal protective equipment was worn, but completion of the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses is unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 13 Soldiers a year to Sports, Recreation and Physical Training mishaps. This mishap is the second off-duty Sports, Recreation and Physical Training fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


If you are planning to operate any off-road type of disciplines or simply trail riding with others, be sure to stay on well-marked and frequently used trails to prevent any occurrences with fencing and avoid unforeseen surprises such as holes, abandoned mines, well pipes, debris, ditches or drop offs, all of which could be disastrous if encountered suddenly at speed.

Dirt Bike Riding Tips:

-Always wear a Department of Transportation-compliant helmet, goggles, long sleeves, long pants, over-the-ankle boots and gloves.
-Except for dual-purpose models, never ride on paved surfaces except to cross when done safely and permitted by law; another vehicle could hit you. Dirt bikes are designed to be operated off-highway.
-Never ride under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
-Supervise riders younger than 16; dirt bikes are not toys.
-Never permit youngsters to ride dirt bikes that are too tall or too powerful for their capabilities.
-Don’t ride alone on remote trails. Use the buddy system.
-Ride only on designated trails and at a safe speed.
-Take a hands-on riding course.

 

 

PLR 21-005 - Off-Duty Water-Related Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Chief Warrant Officer 2 assigned to U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, Republic of Korea, and TDY to Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia, died in an off-duty water-related mishap 18 October 2020 on Tybee Island, Georgia, at 1510 local. After eating lunch on the beach, the Soldier walked out to a sandbar until he was waist deep in the water. His friends lost sight of the Soldier and notified a lifeguard, who began searching. At approximately 1700, the lifeguard found the Soldier unresponsive in the water. The county coroner pronounced the Soldier dead at 1829. No alcohol use was reported; however, Tybee Island had red beach flags posted, indicating high-hazard conditions.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of eight Soldiers a year to off-duty water-related mishaps. This tragedy was the first fatal off-duty water-related mishap of FY21 and below the number of off-duty water-related fatalities from this time last year.

Safety tips for swimming at the beach:
- Never swim alone and, when possible, swim at a lifeguard-protected beach.
- Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards.
- Make sure you understand the significance of warning flags and understand that the absence of red flags does not assure safe conditions.
- When swimming at an unguarded beach, be cautious at all times. If in doubt, don’t go out!
- When caught in a rip current, remain calm to think clearly and conserve your energy:
* Don’t fight a rip current. If you are unable to swim out of it, float or tread water calmly. Then swim parallel to the shoreline.
* When certain you are out of the current, swim toward shore.
* If you are still unable to reach shore, draw attention to yourself: face the shore, wave your arms and yell for help.

 

 

PLR 20-086 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Sergeant assigned to Vicenza, Italy, died in an off-duty hiking mishap 19 September 2020 in Valli del Pasubio, Italy. The Soldier was hiking on the Road of 52 Tunnels trail with another Soldier when he stopped to pose for a picture and fell approximately 300 meters through steep and rocky terrain. When the other Soldier could not locate or communicate with the fallen Soldier, he coordinated a medical evacuation with the assistance of an Italian guide. Italian medical personnel made multiple attempts in difficult terrain to retrieve the Soldier before finally evacuating him to a local hospital. While en route, the on-board MEDEVAC physician pronounced the Soldier dead. The mishap is under investigation.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of five Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the third fatal off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY20 and below the number of fatalities from this time last year.

The Road of 52 Tunnels was built during World War I by the Italian Army. Back then, it was designated for mules, which carried equipment and supplies to the Italian front lines. The road is situated in northern Italy and is a popular hiking trail.


Hiking Safety Tips:

1. Consult a park ranger.
When deciding where to hike, your best bet is typically going to be a national or state park. They're staffed by rangers with a wealth of information about what you need to stay safe in that particular location. Give the park office a call before your hike, visit the official National Park Service (NPS) site or stop by the office before you leave the trailhead.

2. Agree on an emergency plan.
Part of your plan for any hike should be what you're going to do in an emergency situation. Before heading out, know how you will call or send for help in the unlikely event something bad happens.

These are the key questions your plan needs to answer:

-Will there be reliable cell service? Is someone bringing a fully charged phone and a portable charger? If not, is someone bringing a personal locator beacon, satellite messaging device that can get emergency messages out by pinging satellites with your GPS data, or satellite phone?
-If there's an emergency, does the park have its own emergency number, or should you call
911?
-If you can't transmit a message, which one of you will volunteer to get help?

3. Stay on the trail.
For the sake of your own safety, the natural resources, other hikers and a potential search party, it is paramount that you stay on that trail. Your odds of encountering a risky obstacle go up when you step off the path. It's also easy to get turned around. Veering off the trail also leads to what rangers call "social trails," or unofficial routes carved into the wilderness by wayward hikers. Social trails can trample vegetation, disturb animals, cause erosion and endanger hikers after you who might think it's the right way.

4. Go for a small trial hike before taking on a major one.
Some things are hard to figure out until you're actually out there. Go for a modest hike before a major one, especially if you're new to hiking. A modest hike allows you to shake out your gear, feel out the weight of your pack, break in your boots, and figure out how much food and water you consume as an individual.

5. Be extra careful on the second half of the hike.
The second half of a trip or the end of the day is usually when accidents like falls, slips and trips happen. Your energy levels are lower, your leg muscles are fatigued and your mind might be more focused on getting to the finish than the next step. Take your time and be extra careful with your footing.

6. Be ready to turn back.
You can look at a map and talk to folks all day. But when the rubber meets the road and you have to make decisions, you've got to be willing to turn around. You're more likely to make a poor judgment call — ignoring signs your body needs a break, pushing a straggler to keep up, pressing on when a storm rolls in — when you're hyper-focused on getting to an endpoint. You'll find it easier to be flexible if you keep in mind an objective besides the summit, literally or metaphorically.

 

 

135678910Last