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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-052 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A 21-year-old Specialist assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in an off-duty water-related mishap 25 June 2022 in American Lake at Shoreline Park on the installation at 2030 local. The Soldier was seen struggling before submerging, and bystanders rendered aid when he did not resurface. He was transported to the local hospital by emergency medical services personnel where he was pronounced dead. The involvement of alcohol or drugs is currently unknown. This mishap is still under investigation by the Army Criminal Investigation Division.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of eight Soldiers a year to off-duty water-related mishaps. This was the third fatal off-duty water-related mishap of FY22 and above the number of off-duty water-related fatalities from this time last year.

Safety Tips:
Swimming in open water (lakes, rivers, ponds, and the ocean) is harder than in a pool. People tire faster and get into trouble more quickly. A person can go underwater in a murky lake, making them very hard to find, or be swept away in currents.

- Swim in a lifeguarded area, especially if you are not a strong swimmer.
- Be cautious of sudden drop-offs in lakes and rivers. People who can't swim or aren't strong swimmers have slipped into deeper water and drowned.
- Stay sober when on or in the water. Alcohol and other drugs increase the effects of weather, temperature, and wave action.

For additional information preventing swimming and other water-related mishaps, please visit: https://safety.army.mil/OFF-DUTY/Sports-and-Recreation/Water-Safety


 

PLR 22-049 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Cadet assigned to the U.S. Military Academy Preparatory School, West Point, New York, died in an off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap 7 June 2022 on Mount Brown in Glacier National Park, Montana. The Cadet was hiking (Class 4 scramble climbing) with a friend on Mount Brown when they became separated. The friend could not find the Cadet, so they contacted local authorities at approximately 1521 to assist. Air rescue personnel located the Cadet about 1902 hours, and he was pronounced dead. The coroner reported the Cadet died of blunt force trauma as a result of a fall.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of 12 Soldiers a year to off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the third off-duty sports, recreation and physical training mishap of FY22.

Safety Tips:

Know your terrain. The terrain should be categorized into classes from 1 to 5, with Class 1 referring to flat, smooth walking and Class 4 as sustained vertical rock climbing.

Always start your scrambling practice with Class 1 or 2, which may only require an occasional hand for balance. Class 4 scramble climbing presents a more considerable risk due to the highest potential for high falls. Only increase your attempt at a higher a terrain ratings class once you have had plenty of practice and you are confident in your skills.

When conducting Class 4 scramble climbing:
-Always maintain three points of contact on steep terrain with either two hands and one foot or two feet and one hand.
-Keep heavy objects close to your body to prevent the swinging of items outside your backpack that could potentially throw off your center of gravity.
-Test any vegetation used as a handhold/anchor before committing your entire weight.
-Study the route and appropriately rate the terrain for scrambling, so you can cover it confidently.

Consult a park ranger. When deciding where to hike, your best bet is typically going to be a national or state park. They're staffed by rangers with a wealth of information about what you need to stay safe in that particular location. Give the park office a call before your hike, visit the official National Park Service (NPS) site or stop by the office before you leave the trailhead.

Agree on an emergency plan. Part of your plan for any hike should be what you're going to do in an emergency situation. Before heading out, know how you will call or send for help in the unlikely event something bad happens.

 

PLR 22-046 - Off-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in an off-duty water-related mishap 29 May 2022 in Pueblo, Colorado, at 2000 local. The Soldier was operating a 16-foot Sea Ray vessel that overturned in high winds and waves. He and his wife were pronounced dead at the scene. Although the vessel was designed to carry just seven to eight passengers, there were 13 aboard, including eight children and five adults. All the children were wearing flotation devices; however, the adults were not. Alcohol use is unknown at this time.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of eight Soldiers a year to off-duty water-related mishaps. This tragedy was the second fatal off-duty water-related mishap of FY22 and above the number of off-duty water-related fatalities from this time last year.

Boating Safety Tips:
•Always wear an approved life jacket - According to 2020 Coast Guard statistics regarding fatal recreational boating mishaps, 86% of those who drowned failed to wear a life jacket.
•Take a boating safety course - According to 2020 Coast Guard statistics regarding fatal recreational boating mishaps, 77% of deaths occurred on boats where the operator had not received boating safety instruction.
•Don’t drink and operate a boat - Alcohol is the leading contributing factor in fatal boating accidents; boating under the influence on waterways is just as dangerous and illegal as DUI on a roadway.
•File a float plan with someone you trust and include a recent photo of your boat - A float plan is an itinerary of when and where you plan to go while on the water. It is to be completed before you go boating and given to a person who can notify the Coast Guard or other rescue organization if you fail to check in according to the plan.
•Know and adhere to the maximum load capacity of your boat - Boats loaded beyond their capacity will swamp or capsize more easily and will be more difficult to control.
•Check that your equipment is in good working order - Get a free vessel safety check with your local U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary or U.S. Power Squadron.
•Keep an eye out for changing weather - If you notice storm clouds, a sudden temperature drop or wind speed increasing, play it safe and get off the water.

 

PLR 22-036 - On-Duty Sports, Recreation, and Physical Training Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation, Workplace
A Private First Class assigned to Fort Stewart, Georgia, died in an on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishap occurring 22 April 2022, on the installation. The Soldier was conducting a lap swim as part of pool duty certification when he submerged and did not resurface. Class lifeguards pulled the Soldier from underwater and identified a bleeding head injury and no detectable heartbeat. A lifeguard administered CPR until emergency medical services personnel arrived. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital, where he was treated for cardiac arrest and drowning. He was subsequently medically evacuated to a hospital in Savannah, where he was placed on life support. The Soldier was removed from life support three days later following organ donation.

Since FY17, the Army has lost an average of one Soldier a year to on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishaps. This tragedy was the second on-duty sports, recreation, and physical training mishap of FY22.


Safety is the first concern when training Soldiers in and around water. The following factors are important:

·Know the swimming ability level of each Soldier.
·Monitor Soldiers for overexertion and fatigue.
·Encourage Soldiers to communicate symptoms of overexertion and fatigue.
·Ensure instructors/lifeguards are properly trained and certified.
·Make sure appropriate safety equipment is serviceable and on-site.
·Use the buddy system. (Pair a strong swimmer with a weaker one)
·Have safety and emergency action plans in place and verify all participants understand them.

 

PLR 22-034 - GMV Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, Sports & Recreation, Workplace
A 20-year-old Private First Class assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, died in a GMV mishap 25 April 2022 at the Yakima Training Center (YTC), Washington, at approximately 0540 local. The unit was executing a four-vehicle convoy, as the convoy moved down a hill, when the driver of an M1083 lost control of the vehicle resulting in the vehicle rolling several times. County and YTC emergency services, installation range control, and the U.S. Army Air Ambulance Detachment responded. Upon arrival, one Soldier was pronounced dead and two others were medevac'd to Yakima Memorial Hospital. The U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center is leading a safety investigation into the mishap.

Since 2017, the Army has experienced an average of 10 GMV fatalities per year. This was the third GMV fatality of FY22 and above the number of GMV fatalities during the same time period last year.


Safety Tips:
-When approaching a steep hill or slope the driver must adjust the vehicle speed to allow a "Speed Cushion" for maneuvering. Drivers should come to a complete stop and downshift to a lower transmission gear range enabling the engine to become a braking action that helps control vehicle speed.

-If the vehicle begins to skid due to a slippery surface, apply moderate acceleration, reduce speed, apply moderate brake pressure, and make no quick or fast turns.

-Drivers of large vehicles will require additional space ahead of the vehicles in front. If the vehicle ahead should slow or stop, you will need more distance to stop your vehicle. As a general rule, you need at least one second for every 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds up to 40 mph. At higher speeds, you must add an additional second for every 10 feet.

-Ensure drivers have been properly trained and licensed on the vehicle they are operating and that they receive convoy training IAW ATP 4-11, to address the concerns of high center-of-gravity, high ground pressure, large size tires, and reduced visibility associated with Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles and other large vehicles.

-Ensuring vehicle seat belts are used to provide the ability to remain restrained to a stable surface is an essential component of safety and survival. Seat belts should be worn at all times and enforced by leadership as a tactical discipline.

 

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