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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-029 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4

A Private First Class assigned to the Indiana Army National Guard, Crawfordsville, Indiana, was on Title 32 502(f) orders in support of COVID vaccinations, when he died in a PMV-4 mishap 16 January 2021 in Bloomington, Indiana, at 2300 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle en route to his hotel when he collided with another vehicle. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital and pronounced dead upon arrival by the attending physician. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, the Soldier’s use of a seat belt and alcohol use, as contributing factors are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 34 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 14th PMV-4 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Drowsy-driving crashes:

1. Occur most frequently between midnight and 6 a.m., or in the late afternoon. At both times of the day, people experience dips in their circadian rhythm — the human body’s internal clock that regulates sleep;

2. Often involve only a single driver (and no passengers) running off the road at a high rate of speed with no evidence of braking; and

3. Frequently occur on rural roads and highways.

Tips on How to Avoid Driving Drowsy

1. Getting adequate sleep on a daily basis is the only true way to protect yourself against the risks of driving when you’re drowsy. Experts urge consumers to make it a priority to get seven to eight hours of sleep per night.

2. Before the start of a long family car trip, get adequate sleep or you could put your entire family and others at risk.

3. Many teens do not get enough sleep at a stage in life when their biological need for sleep increases, which makes them vulnerable to the risk of drowsy-driving crashes, especially on longer trips. Advise your teens to delay driving until they’re well-rested.

4. Avoid drinking any alcohol before driving. Consumption of alcohol interacts with sleepiness to increase drowsiness and impairment.

5. Always check your prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to see if drowsiness could result from their use.

6. If you take medications that could cause drowsiness as a side effect, use public transportation when possible.

7. If you drive, avoid driving during the peak sleepiness periods (midnight to 6 a.m. and late afternoon). If you must drive during the peak sleepiness periods, stay vigilant for signs of drowsiness, such as crossing over roadway lines or hitting a rumble strip, especially if you’re driving alone.

Short-term Interventions

1. Drinking coffee or energy drinks alone is not always enough. They might help you feel more alert, but the effects last only a short time, and you might not be as alert as you think you are. If you drink coffee and are seriously sleep-deprived, you still may have “micro sleeps” or brief losses of consciousness that can last for four or five seconds. This means that at 55 miles per hour, you’ve traveled more than 100 yards down the road while asleep. That’s plenty of time to cause a crash.

2. If you start to get sleepy while you’re driving, drink one to two cups of coffee and pull over for a short 20-minute nap in a safe place, such as a lighted, designated rest stop. This has been shown to increase alertness in scientific studies, but only for short time periods.

Common Circadian Rhythm Disorders

Shift work sleep disorder: This sleep disorder affects people who frequently rotate shifts or work at night. A conflict between someone's circadian rhythm and the time of their shift can mean they get up to four hours less sleep than the average person.

Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS): This is a disorder of sleep timing. People with DSPS tend to fall asleep very late at night and have a hard time waking up in time for work, school, or social activities. It's especially common in teens and young adults.

Advanced sleep phase syndrome (ASPS): This is a disorder in which a person goes to sleep earlier and wakes earlier than they wanted. For example, they might fall asleep between 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. and wake up between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.

Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder: This disorder often affects people who are blind because the circadian clock is set by the light-dark cycle. With this condition, that cycle is disturbed. It can cause a serious lack of sleep time and quality at night and sleepiness during daylight hours.

Irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder: With this disorder, people's circadian rhythms are jumbled. They may sleep in a series of naps over 24 hours.

 

 

PLR 21-025 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Drum, New York, died in a PMV-4 mishap 3 January 2021 in Ceres Township, Pennsylvania, at 0145 local. The Soldier was a passenger in a vehicle that crashed when the driver took a left-hand curve at a high rate of speed and struck a concrete barrier, ejecting the Soldier. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver was transported to the hospital with minor injuries. The Soldier was reportedly not wearing a seat belt during the mishap. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 13th PMV-4 fatality of FY21


Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
- Greater potential for loss of vehicle control;
- Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment;
- Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger;
- Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries;
- Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.

How to be a better passenger

Share the responsibilities:
Making yourself useful – whether you offer to operate the navigation system or act as another set of eyes for the driver – you can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue. Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task at hand. If you feel the driver is doing something unsafe, say something. As a passenger, you’re letting the driver gamble with your life and the lives of your family and friends. Be a better passenger and protect your life and the life of the driver.

 

 

PLR 21-024 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-4 mishap 23 December 2020 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at 1752 local. The Soldier was allegedly driving on the highway at a high rate of speed when another motorist merged into his lane, striking his vehicle. The Soldier’s vehicle flipped and hit a pole. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier was wearing a seat belt, and alcohol use is not suspected. The mishap is under investigation by the Colorado Springs Police Department.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the 12th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
- Greater potential for loss of vehicle control
- Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment
- Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger
- Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries
- Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.
- For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2017, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

 

 

PLR 21-023 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-4 mishap 23 December 2020 in Oklaunion,
Texas, at 1630 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle on a highway when he entered the center median and overcorrected, causing his vehicle to skid across the road. The vehicle entered a ditch and rolled several times, ejecting the Soldier. The Soldier’s wife, who was riding as passenger, was extracted and transported by emergency medical services to the local hospital with serious injuries. The Soldier was reportedly not wearing his seat belt. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed as a contributing factor, are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the
11th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


1. Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3. Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
4. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
5. Maintain the posted speed limit.
6. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.
7. If you veer off the road, do not panic. Gradually reduce your speed, look in the direction you want to go and slowly steer back onto the roadway while watching for traffic.

 

 

PLR 21-022 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 18 December 2020 in Georgetown, Texas, at 0500 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle on the highway when he was hit head on by a civilian driving on the wrong side of the road. The collision caused the Soldier's vehicle to rollover causing him to sustain injuries to his head and left leg. Emergency Medical Services arrived on scene and extracted the Soldier from the vehicle. According to authorities on the scene, alcohol was suspected on the part of the civilian driver. The Soldier was transported to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead by the local Justice of the Peace.

The Soldier was reportedly wearing his seatbelt. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed and alcohol as a contributing factor on the Soldier’s part, are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap is the tenth PMV-4 fatality of FY21.

 

 

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