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Flip of the Switch
We’ve all been trained on blind cockpit drills and the need for “knowing your cockpit.” However, we tend to forget some of the reasons for these drills.
ACT-E and Me
Complacency is one of the most common contributors to aviation accidents and, being a senior aviator, I guess I am as guilty as the next. The following story was, thankfully, my wake-up call.
  • 1 November 2014
  • Comments: 0
Five Tips to Improve Safety in Your Unit
In many units, safety is less of a state of mind and more of a punchline.  Nothing drives this point home more that the high number of preliminary loss reports for motor vehicle accidents.
  • 1 November 2014
  • Comments: 0
The Old Days
Institutional lore records a myriad of instances where an aviator did something foolish and dinged, bent or damaged an aircraft; received minor, if any, punishment; and went on to become a valuable part of the organization.
  • 1 November 2014
  • Author: Army Safety
  • Number of views: 10304
  • Comments: 0
Necessity vs. Proficiency
It was a clear, cool day in Afghanistan when the aircraft departed the runway under perfect visual flight rules conditions. While climbing to cruise altitude in a left-hand orbit, air traffic control contacted the pilot and vectored him to a 180 heading to deconflict with other traffic.
  • 1 November 2014
  • Author: Army Safety
  • Number of views: 10568
  • Comments: 0
Hot Rods
Years ago, I learned the value of speaking up for what’s right, regardless of the consequences. Early in my career as an Army aviator, I was told if I closed my pie hole and opened my ears, I might learn something. I was careful not to judge other pilots’ mistakes too harshly because one day I may do something less than brilliant. We have all done something stupid, whether we admit it or not.
  • 1 October 2014
  • Author: Army Safety
  • Number of views: 11357
  • Comments: 0
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