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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-032 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 16 April 2022 in El Paso, Texas, at 2352 local. The Soldier reportedly was attempting to change lanes at a high rate of speed by splitting between two vehicles on the roadway. He lost control, struck the rear of another vehicle, and was thrown onto landscaping rocks. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. It is unknown who notified 911. The Soldier was not wearing a helmet, and it is currently unknown if alcohol or drugs were involved. The Soldier completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse I (BRC-I) in May 2018: however, he did not complete the Advanced RiderCourse within 12 months of finishing the BRC-I. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 14th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.


Lane splitting occurs when a motorcyclist passes one or more vehicles between two lanes, often the area of the road where the road line is painted. It is also known as white-lining to seasoned motorcyclists. Typically, motorcyclists will use lane splitting to avoid stopping in heavy traffic.
Currently, “lane splitting” is only legal in seven states, and a state House bill is pending approval in an eighth. It is illegal in Texas.

The California Highway Patrol states the following and provides the general safety tips below:

“Although lane splitting is legal in California, motorcyclists are encouraged to exercise extreme caution when traveling between lanes of stopped or slow-moving traffic,” said CHP Commissioner Warren Stanley. “Every rider has the ultimate responsibility for their own decision-making and safety.”

These general safety tips are provided to assist you when riding; however, they are not guaranteed to keep you safe:
• Consider the total environment when you are lane splitting (this includes the width of lanes, the size of surrounding vehicles, as well as current roadway, weather, and lighting conditions).
• Danger increases at greater speed differentials.
• Danger increases as overall speed increases.
• It is typically safer to split between the far-left lanes than between the other lanes of traffic.
• Try to avoid lane splitting next to large vehicles (big rigs, buses, motorhomes, etc.).
• Riding on the shoulder is illegal; it is not considered lane splitting.
• Be visible – avoid remaining in the blind spots of other vehicles or lingering between vehicles.
• Help drivers see you by wearing brightly colored/reflective protective gear and using high beams during daylight hours.


 

PLR 22-031 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-2 mishap 10 April 2022 in Clarksville, Tennessee, at 2345 local. The Soldier reportedly failed to negotiate a curve, struck the curb, and was ejected into nearby trees. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, the involvement of alcohol or drugs, the Soldier’s use of personal protective equipment, and completion of the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training, are currently unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 13th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY22.

 

PLR 22-030 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-2 mishap 15 March 2022 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, at 1910 local. A witness observed the Soldier weaving carelessly through traffic at a high rate of speed when he jumped a curb and struck a sign. The Soldier flipped while on the motorcycle before coming to rest. Paramedics responded and the Soldier was transported to the local hospital for treatment. He was placed on life support and died 17 March. The Soldier was reportedly wearing personal protective equipment and had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse. The use of alcohol or drugs as contributing factors is unknown at this time. This mishap is still under investigation by the local law enforcement.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 25 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 12th PMV-2 fatality of FY22 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2017, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

Speed also affects your safety even when you are driving at the speed limit but too fast for road conditions, such as during bad weather, when a road is under repair, or in an area at night that isn’t well lit.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:

•Greater potential for loss of vehicle control.
•Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment.
•Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger.
•Increased degree of crash severity, leading to more severe injuries.
•Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.

 

PLR 22-029 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 30-year-old Staff Sergeant assigned to Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, died in a PMV-4 mishap 12 March 2022 in Eastover, South Carolina, at 2230 local. The Soldier reportedly rear-ended a civilian pickup truck at a high rate of speed, causing his vehicle to flip into the median. The Soldier sustained fatal injuries. The pickup truck ran off the left side of the road into the median. It is unknown who notified 911. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the Soldier’s use of a seat belt and the involvement of alcohol or drugs, are also unknown. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for the South Carolina Highway Patrol to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 10th PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Speeding endangers everyone on the road.In 2019, speeding killed 9,478 people. We all know the frustrations of modern life and juggling a busy schedule, but speed limits are put in place to protect all road users.
For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2019, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

Speeding and alcohol impairment often coincide; this varies with driver age. While 25% of speeding drivers under age 21 involved in fatal crashes are alcohol impaired (BAC = 0.08+ g/dL), over 40% in the 21 to 44 age groups are impaired. The percent of alcohol-impaired drivers falls sharply to 32% among 55- to 64-year-old drivers and continues to decline as the driver age increases.
In 2019, almost 3 in 4 (74%) of speeding drivers involved in fatal crashes between midnight and 3 a.m. were alcohol-impaired (BAC of .08 g/dL or higher) compared to 43%of non-speeding drivers.

 

PLR 22-028 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 30-year-old Captain assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 11 March 2022 in South Bend, Indiana, at 2115 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle when another vehicle, traveling at a high rate of speed, crossed the centerline and struck him head on. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. Local law enforcement confirmed there was no alcohol involvement by the Soldier. It is unknown who notified 911. The Soldier's use of a seat belt is also unknown. This mishap is currently being investigated by the Benton County Sheriff’s Department.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the ninth PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

 

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