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Most of my flying for the past 30 years as a reservist and civilian pilot has been under visual meteorological conditions. Therefore, I am accustomed to flying with most of my attention focused outside the cockpit.
Just Say No
When we are tired, we sometimes make mistakes we wouldn't normally make. This incident taught me that although I was just trying to help, sometimes you just have to say no. I will use this lesson for the rest of my career. 
  • 1 April 2014
  • Comments: 0
Seconds Count
As a pilot, I know that helicopters have vibrations. Heck, every vehicle has vibrations — some good, some bad. The point is you have to be able to determine if you should continue the mission, return to base or, in our case, just land!
  • 1 April 2014
  • Comments: 0
Gut Check
I was excited about the flight. The commander and I would fly to the site — I as the PC and he as my co-pilot — recon it, refuel, have lunch and return. I was confident in my abilities to handle any situation and wanted to show him what I could do.
  • 1 April 2014
  • Author: Army Safety
  • Number of views: 1462
  • Comments: 0
The Risks are Still Real
I recall that I was scared to death the first time I had to fly low level or punch into the clouds at 400 feet. That scared feeling is a natural reaction to a dangerous situation. While we may become desensitized to these situations, the risk is still very real.  
  • 1 March 2014
  • Author: Army Safety
  • Number of views: 1349
  • Comments: 0
Weathering the Storm
I’ll think twice about trying to push into weather, especially when there isn’t a real need to do so. While I am glad to have experienced flying in this type of situation, I hope to never have to go through it again.
  • 1 March 2014
  • Author: Army Safety
  • Number of views: 1481
  • Comments: 0
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