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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-013 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Whiteman Armory, Missouri, died in a PMV-2 mishap 6 November 2020 in Springfield, Missouri, at 0330 local. At this time, it is unknown if the Soldier was the operator or passenger. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, use of personal protective equipment, completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors are currently unknown. The safety point of contact is waiting for local authorities to release additional information.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the sixth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

 

PLR 21-008 PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in an PMV-2 mishap 7 November 2020 at 1500 local. The Soldier lost control of his motorcycle on a highway when he was sideswiped by a van attempting to change lanes. He was declared dead at the local university hospital. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment; however, he did not complete any of the mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation training courses. Alcohol is not suspected as a contributing factor to the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the seventh off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

-Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

-Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

-Often drivers do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

-Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.

-What will stop or prevent the occurrence of accidents is more rigorous and advanced motorcycle training.

-Training can make riders vigilant and develop presence of mind while on the road. It will also promote safe and defensive riding habits, proactive behaviors and visual alertness.

-Quality motorcycle training gives the riders an understanding and observance of road and traffic rules, as well as a healthy road disposition.

-Invest in a top-quality helmet to efficiently protect the most critical part of your body.

-More importance should be given to developing skill in motorcycle operating proficiency through training that will ensure the rider’s continued safety on the road.

 

 

PLR 21-007 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in an off-duty PMV-2 mishap 31 October 2020 in Clarksville, Tennessee, at 1450 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle with a civilian passenger when a tire detached from another vehicle and struck him. The Soldier and passenger were transported to a local health care center via Life Flight, where he was pronounced dead upon arrival. The passenger’s current status is unknown. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment and completed all mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. Speed and alcohol and drug use are unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the fifth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of PMV-2 fatalities for the same time period last year.

-Road hazards are a common cause of motorcycle accidents. Things that have little effect on a car, such as debris, uneven road surfaces, small objects or wet pavement, can cause a motorcycle to crash. Motorcyclists should understand what constitutes a hazard, be alert for such dangers and take precautions to avoid them.

-Debris or objects in the road, such as parts of tire treads, items fallen from trucks (furniture, tools, boxes), branches or rocks, are more hazardous to motorcycles than cars. Not only can they cause a crash, but the object itself can hit and seriously harm the rider.

-When you are riding your motorcycle, always remain vigilant. Anticipate that motorists, road debris and flying objects will come at you because they do! Keep your eyes and your ears open and expect the worst so you can prevent it.

-Do not tailgate trucks or trailers hauling materials, and always keep enough room to avoid debris and obstacles on the road.

-Do not ride directly next to vehicles, and try to keep a 2 to 3 second distance between you and any cars in front of you.

-If you see debris or something flying at you, do not panic! Try to calmly process what is happening and take evasive maneuvers. If you panic, you may overreact and crash your motorcycle instead of maneuvering around the hazard calmly.

 

 



PLR 21-006 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-2 mishap 22 October 2020 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at 1502 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he collided with a vehicle that made a left turn into his lane. Emergency medical technicians arrived on scene to provide assistance and pronounced the Soldier dead. The Soldier had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Basic RiderCourse and was wearing personal protective equipment. Speed, alcohol and drug use are unknown at this time. This mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the fourth PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

-Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

-Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

-Often drivers do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

-Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.

 

 

PLR 21-004 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in an off-duty PMV-2 mishap 17 October 2020 in Fountain, Colorado, at 1700 local. The Soldier and three other riders were operating their motorcycles when an aggressive driver attempted to pass on the left shoulder, according to witnesses. The driver made a right turn back into traffic, striking the lead motorcycle riders who were riding in pairs. The Soldier and another rider were forced into the opposite lane and into a ditch before their motorcycles came to rest. A witness who was emergency medical technician-qualified stopped to render aid. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene while the other rider suffered a concussion, contusions and bruises. The driver left the scene, but was arrested the following day. The Soldier was wearing personal protective equipment and completed the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training courses. Speed, alcohol and drug involvement are not currently suspected to have contributed to the mishap, which is under investigation.
Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This was the third fatal off-duty PMV-2 mishap of FY21 and above the number of fatalities from this same time frame last year.

Create a space cushion around your vehicle.
A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

-Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you — four or five seconds in inclement weather.

-If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

-If a driver near you is operating their vehicle erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.

 

 

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