X

Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

Learn more: FAQs   |   Subscribe to receive PLRs via email | Unsubscribe   |   Put the PLR Feed on your website   |   PLR Archive

PLR 20-088 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Soldier assigned to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, was involved in a PMV-2 mishap 14 September 2020, in Pulaski County, Missouri. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he struck a deer. He was evacuated via Life Flight to the nearest trauma center and died 11 days later. Completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses have not been verified. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of personal protective equipment, speed, and alcohol and drug involvement are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 21st PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Safety Tips:

Think like a hunter:
You know who is rarely surprised by deer on the roads? Hunters, because they know where deer can be expected. If you’re going to ride in deer country you should learn to think like a hunter. Deer populations peak in the spring, but the risk of hitting them on the road peaks in October, November, and December, during the annual rut. Deer are on the move at this time of year. It’s also the time of year when mature adults weigh the most, making collisions that much worse.

Although you can encounter deer at any time of the day or night, they are most active between dusk and midnight, then again at first light. They typically spend the middle of the day in deep cover, but most deer are not really forest dwellers. Learn to identify edge habitat; prime food sources such as standing corn, mast crops like acorns, and orchards; and travel corridors like tree lines, hedgerows, and gullies. Deer are herd animals. If you see one crossing the road in front of you, be alert to others that might be following. If you scare it, it may well reverse course and cross your path again.

Assess and improve your skills:
Always cover the front brake. Practice emergency stops. When you spot a deer ahead, your front brake is a lifesaver, but only if you’re ready, willing, and able to use it right.

Play “What if?” with yourself. When you come across good deer habitat, ask yourself, “What would I do if a deer jumped out from behind that bush?” Mentally rehearse applying the brakes and aiming for a gap with aggressive counter-steering, not target-fixating on the deer.

I’ve heard people claim they increase speed, with the idea that spending less time near the deer limits the opportunity to hit it. In a worst-case scenario, you are better off scrubbing as much speed as possible and hitting them at a slower speed.

Ride for the conditions:
Don’t ignore deer crossing signs, especially at peak times! Wear a helmet and the best protective gear you can afford while operating a motorcycle. Anywhere that you could encounter deer you should also scan and assess the edges of the road. If the grass in the ditch is waist high, you won’t see deer until they step right onto the shoulder. Processing that additional visual information means slowing down for safety.

If you’re riding in a group, increase your following distance and maintain a staggered formation in order to give each rider time and space to brake and take evasive action. If you see deer ahead, slow down and do something (for example, raise an arm or stick out a leg, or flash your brake light) to ensure following riders notice, too. If you pass deer near the road, consider flashing your high beam or honking to warn oncoming drivers and riders.

Although lots of deer are hit on Interstate highways, the per-passenger-mile risk is much lower than the risk on country roads.

 

 

PLR 20-087 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Lieutenant Colonel assigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 26 September 2020 in Atchison, Kansas, at 1553 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle, with his spouse as a passenger, when he collided with another vehicle that failed to yield. Local authorities responded and both the Soldier and his spouse were taken to the local hospital. Upon arrival, the Soldier was pronounced dead by the attending physician. The Soldier’s spouse is hospitalized with non-fatal injuries. The Soldier completed all required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the use of personal protective equipment, speed, and alcohol and drug involvement, are unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the 20th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 but below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Remember these important safety tips when sharing the road with motorcycles:

•Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

•Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

•Often drivers do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

•Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.


Create a space cushion around your motorcycle. A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

•If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

•If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.


Things to consider before riding as a motorcycle passenger:

If you are comfortable with the skill level of the person you're riding with and have a mutual level of trust, then you're ready to enjoy the ride. Here are things to think about before you go:

•Have your own safety gear. What you wear is up to you, but you should be well aware that motorcycle accidents can cause harm very quickly, and protective gear is designed specifically to prevent that. A helmet is the most important piece of safety gear, but gloves, sturdy boots, strong pants, a long-sleeved shirt, and an armored motorcycle jacket are all important pieces of gear too. Borrow gear if you can, but if you'll be riding regularly, get your own.

•Know the type of bike they have. Some big touring bikes and cruisers have passenger seats that look like recliners, while sport bikes and other performance bikes have rear seats that are basically designed to say "nobody belongs here."

•Develop some kind of way to signal to each other while riding. At speed, the rider may not be able to hear a thing you're saying, so it helps to establish some way to communicate by touch. At a minimum, determine a way for you to signal to them when you want to slow down, speed up or stop. If they have a Bluetooth communication device, you can it use to talk to them during the ride even better.

 

 


PLR 20-085 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-2 mishap 17 September 2020 in Divide, Colorado, at 1806 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle with another civilian rider on the road when he lost control and struck a wooden utility pole. Emergency medical service pronounced him dead on the scene. Immediately afterward, a state trooper notified the Soldier’s unit of the mishap. According to the civilian rider, the Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment. The Soldier also completed all required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. Speed and alcohol and drug involvement are not currently suspected to have contributed to the mishap. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 19th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Here are some important safety tips when negotiating a curve:

- As you approach a curve, slow down to a good entry speed allowing you to roll on the throttle as you prepare to navigate the curve and speed up later. Use the rear brake gently.
- Look where you are headed or where you want your motorcycle to go.
- Remember to use the countersteering technique.
- When you can see the exit point of the curve, position your bike to aim for a much straighter line.
- Accelerate after you have negotiated the tightest angle of the curve and you can already see where the road becomes straight again.

 

 

PLR 20-078 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-2 mishap 4 September 2020 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, at 2330 local. The Soldier was riding with a group of other Soldiers when he attempted to transverse a corner at approximately 70-80 mph, causing his motorcycle to strike an electrical box on the side of the road. He was pronounced dead shortly after arriving at the local hospital. Alcohol and drugs are not currently suspected to have contributed to the mishap. Completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses and use of personal protective equipment have not been verified. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 18th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Here are some important safety tips to follow when negotiating a curve:

- As you approach a curve, slow down to a good entry speed, allowing you to roll on the throttle as you prepare to navigate the curve and speed up later. Use the rear brake gently and position your motorcycle outside for the turn. This means, if you are turning left, your bike should be about 3 feet from the right side of the lane and when you want to turn right, the motorcycle should be about 3 feet from the centerline of the road.

- Remember to use the countersteering technique and apply it at the start of your entry into the curve. Keep your throttle open and roll to the curve, keeping a good distance away from the inside of the curve initially. As the angle of the curve tightens, you should be leaning closer to the curve. Point your eyes in the direction you want the motorcycle to go. At the same time, you should be aware of oncoming traffic from the opposite direction.

- Accelerate after you have negotiated the tightest angle of the curve and you can already see where the road becomes straight again. You should be moving away from the inside of the curve and more toward the inner lane as you accelerate. Acceleration will push your motorcycle up straight again as you prepare to ride on a straight lane.

 

 

PLR 20-076 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, died in a PMV-2 mishap 26 August 2020 in St. Thomas. At 2215 hours, a civilian notified emergency personnel of a body in bushes next to a motorcycle. Details of the incident are unknown, but the initial investigation suggests the Soldier was riding on the highway when he collided with a guardrail. Use of personal protective equipment and completion of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses have not been verified. Speed and alcohol use are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 17th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

While the specific circumstance surrounding this mishap are unknown at this time, here are some important motorcycle safety tips and facts:

•Per vehicle miles traveled, motorcyclists are about 28 times more likely than people in passenger cars to die in a traffic crash.
•Motorcyclists are more vulnerable to the hazards of road conditions.
•Motorcycles are far less crashworthy and less stable than four-wheel vehicles.
•Look Where You Want To Go: This is an important concept when riding. Looking where you want to go and then going there is crucial to avoid obstacles you may face on the road.
•Obey the speed limit; the faster you go, the longer it will take you to stop. Be aware of local traffic laws and rules of the road.

 

 

123468910Last