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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 20-085 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-2 mishap 17 September 2020 in Divide, Colorado, at 1806 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle with another civilian rider on the road when he lost control and struck a wooden utility pole. Emergency medical service pronounced him dead on the scene. Immediately afterward, a state trooper notified the Soldier’s unit of the mishap. According to the civilian rider, the Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment. The Soldier also completed all required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. Speed and alcohol and drug involvement are not currently suspected to have contributed to the mishap. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 19th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Here are some important safety tips when negotiating a curve:

- As you approach a curve, slow down to a good entry speed allowing you to roll on the throttle as you prepare to navigate the curve and speed up later. Use the rear brake gently.
- Look where you are headed or where you want your motorcycle to go.
- Remember to use the countersteering technique.
- When you can see the exit point of the curve, position your bike to aim for a much straighter line.
- Accelerate after you have negotiated the tightest angle of the curve and you can already see where the road becomes straight again.

 

 

PLR 20-078 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-2 mishap 4 September 2020 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, at 2330 local. The Soldier was riding with a group of other Soldiers when he attempted to transverse a corner at approximately 70-80 mph, causing his motorcycle to strike an electrical box on the side of the road. He was pronounced dead shortly after arriving at the local hospital. Alcohol and drugs are not currently suspected to have contributed to the mishap. Completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses and use of personal protective equipment have not been verified. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 18th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Here are some important safety tips to follow when negotiating a curve:

- As you approach a curve, slow down to a good entry speed, allowing you to roll on the throttle as you prepare to navigate the curve and speed up later. Use the rear brake gently and position your motorcycle outside for the turn. This means, if you are turning left, your bike should be about 3 feet from the right side of the lane and when you want to turn right, the motorcycle should be about 3 feet from the centerline of the road.

- Remember to use the countersteering technique and apply it at the start of your entry into the curve. Keep your throttle open and roll to the curve, keeping a good distance away from the inside of the curve initially. As the angle of the curve tightens, you should be leaning closer to the curve. Point your eyes in the direction you want the motorcycle to go. At the same time, you should be aware of oncoming traffic from the opposite direction.

- Accelerate after you have negotiated the tightest angle of the curve and you can already see where the road becomes straight again. You should be moving away from the inside of the curve and more toward the inner lane as you accelerate. Acceleration will push your motorcycle up straight again as you prepare to ride on a straight lane.

 

 

PLR 20-076 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, died in a PMV-2 mishap 26 August 2020 in St. Thomas. At 2215 hours, a civilian notified emergency personnel of a body in bushes next to a motorcycle. Details of the incident are unknown, but the initial investigation suggests the Soldier was riding on the highway when he collided with a guardrail. Use of personal protective equipment and completion of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses have not been verified. Speed and alcohol use are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 17th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

While the specific circumstance surrounding this mishap are unknown at this time, here are some important motorcycle safety tips and facts:

•Per vehicle miles traveled, motorcyclists are about 28 times more likely than people in passenger cars to die in a traffic crash.
•Motorcyclists are more vulnerable to the hazards of road conditions.
•Motorcycles are far less crashworthy and less stable than four-wheel vehicles.
•Look Where You Want To Go: This is an important concept when riding. Looking where you want to go and then going there is crucial to avoid obstacles you may face on the road.
•Obey the speed limit; the faster you go, the longer it will take you to stop. Be aware of local traffic laws and rules of the road.

 

 

PLR 20-071 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Master Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-2 mishap 16 August 2020 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at 0030 local. The Soldier was riding his motorcycle on the wrong side of the road, with his wife as a passenger, when he collided with an oncoming vehicle. Both the Soldier and his wife were pronounced dead at the scene. Motorcycle Safety Foundation training and the use of personal protective equipment is unknown at this time. Alcohol was suspected as a factor. This mishap is under investigation.

Since FY16, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This was the sixteenth fatal off-duty PMV-2 mishap of FY20 and below the number of PMV-2 fatalities from this time last year.

 

 

PLR 20-068 – PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died in a PMV-2 mishap 2 August 2020 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, at 0100 local. The Soldier was riding another person’s motorcycle on the highway when he lost control. Reportedly, the Soldier was speeding and crossed the median before crashing. Alcohol use is unknown at this time. The Soldier was not wearing a helmet, was not licensed, and had not completed the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training courses. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 15th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

 

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