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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-068 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 12 June 2021 in Killeen, Texas, at 1707 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he hit the side of a civilian pickup truck that was crossing the highway. Paramedics responded and performed lifesaving measures, but the Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier was reportedly wearing personal protective equipment, had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse (BRC I) and was enrolled in BRC II. Speed and alcohol use are unknown at this time. This mishap is still under investigation by the Killeen Police Department.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap was the 14th PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Here are important safety tips to follow when negotiating a curve:

Maintain a space cushion: A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

- Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – make it four or five seconds in inclement weather.
- Avoid distractions, including mobile phones and other devices, which can divert your attention, even with hands-free functionality.
- Aim high when looking out over the handlebars at the road.
- Keep your eyes moving, meaning don't just stare at the road ahead; make sure to check mirrors and other views frequently.
- Leave yourself an out; this means anticipating what would happen if you had to swerve or slam on the brakes.
- Position both hands firmly but comfortably on handlebars.

 

 

PLR 21-062 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-2 mishap 14 May 2021, in Huntington, New York, at 1200 local. While on terminal leave, the Soldier was operating his motorcycle, when he struck a civilian vehicle that failed to yield the right of way while making a left-hand turn. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. Speed and alcohol were not causal factors in the mishap. The Soldier completed Basic RiderCourse and was wearing all required personal protective equipment.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the 13th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.


Maintain a Space Cushion

A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

-Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – make it four or five seconds in inclement weather.
-Avoid distractions, including mobile phones and other devices, which can divert your attention, even with hands-free functionality.
-Aim high when looking out over the handlebars at the road.
-Keep your eyes moving, meaning don't just stare at the road ahead; make sure to check mirrors and other views frequently.
-Leave yourself an out; this means anticipating what would happen if you had to swerve or slam on the brakes.
-Position both hands firmly but comfortably on handlebars.

 

 

PLR 21-050 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, was involved in an off-duty PMV-2 mishap 5 April 2021 in El Paso, Texas, at 0100 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle at night at a high rate of speed when he hit a center road barrier on the road. He was ejected from his motorcycle, suffering severe injuries and transported to the local hospital for medical attention. It was reported that he was wearing a helmet. It is unknown at this time if the Soldier had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Basic RiderCourse or if he was wearing full personal protective equipment. The Soldier died due to his injuries and was pronounced dead at the hospital on 10 April 2021 at 2000 hours. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the 12th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.


Motorcycle Safety Tips

Inspect Lights Prior to Trip
If you know ahead of time that you will be riding at night, it’s a good idea to inspect all of the bike’s lights prior to a trip. Knowing if there are issues with any of the lights will allow you to make repairs before hitting the road, keeping you from an accident that has the potential to cause traumatic injury. It is a good idea to make sure the headlight, taillights, and indicators are operational and not burnt out. Also, make sure that they are bright enough to let other motorists see you. Clean the lens of a headlight of any dirt, dust, or other debris that have accumulated from recent rides.

Watch for Wildlife
When riding at night, you must be extra vigilant for wildlife. It’s not that you won’t encounter wildlife during the day, but they are more active at night. Be on the lookout for deer, possums, bears, and any other wildlife that could run out in front of your motorcycle while on the road at night.

Dress for the Dark
Motorcycle riders should always dress appropriately when on their bike and this includes wearing reflective clothing. This is a habit you should get accustomed to in the daytime so that it becomes second nature if you decide to ride at night. In addition to a hi-resolution reflective vest, you should also wear your helmet, closed-toed shoes, and clothing that covers as much of your body as possible. If you don’t want to wear a vest, place hi-resolution reflective stripping on your jacket and helmet. This will help other motorists see you as they approach.

Be Aware of Other Motorists
As focused as you have to be on your own driving habits when riding a motorcycle at night, you must also focus on the other motorists around you. Other drivers might not turn off their high beams as they approach you, might not notice you in your lane, and could be driving drunk. These are all issues that you must be aware of when riding a motorcycle at night.

Be Mindful of SpeedMotorcyclists should be mindful of their speed no matter the time of day they ride, but even more so when riding at night. You should only ride as fast as you can see the road in front of you. If you can see plenty of the road ahead of you, drive at a speed you feel comfortable with, but know that hazards can appear without warning.

 

 

PLR 21-041 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 12 March 2021 in El Paso, Texas, at 2021 local. The Soldier was riding his motorcycle when he struck the back of a moving semi-tractor-trailer. First responders arrived and pronounced him dead at the scene. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment and completed the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. It was reported that speed was a factor that contributed to the mishap. Alcohol and drug use as contributing factors is unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the 11th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


NHTSA considers a crash to be speeding-related if the driver was charged with a speeding-related offense or if an investigating police officer indicated that racing, driving too fast for conditions, or exceeding the posted speed limit was a contributing factor in the crash.

Never drink or speed. More than 40 percent of motorcycle riders who die in single-vehicle crashes are alcohol-impaired, and speed is at play in more than one-third of fatal crashes

Maintain a space cushion: A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

•Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – make it four or five seconds in inclement weather.
•Avoid distractions, including mobile phones and other devices, which can divert your attention, even with hands-free functionality.
•Aim high when looking out over the handlebars at the road.
•Keep your eyes moving, meaning don't just stare at the road ahead; make sure to check mirrors and other views frequently.
•Leave yourself an out; this means anticipating what would happen if you had to swerve or slam on the brakes.
•Position both hands firmly but comfortably on handlebars.
•Never drive while feeling drowsy or sleepy; pull over at a rest stop or other safe place to take a break and get some real rest.

 

 

PLR 21-038 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall died in a PMV-2 mishap 13 March 2021 in Alexandria, Virginia, at 1100 local. Two Soldiers were riding their motorcycles when they swerved to avoid colliding with another vehicle traveling in the same direction. The lane they moved to was occupied by a stopped city bus. The first Soldier ran into the rear of the bus and subsequently started a vehicle fire. The second Soldier laid down his bike and avoided the bus. Both Soldiers were transported to the local hospital for further treatment. The first Soldier later died, while the second was treated for road rash and released several hours later. The initial report states that both Soldiers were wearing all appropriate PPE, licensed, and had completed all required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. The use of alcohol or drugs is unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 10th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.
Create a space cushion around your vehicle.

A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

-Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – four or five seconds in inclement weather.
-If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.
-If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver.
-Avoid distractions, including mobile phones and other devices, which can divert your attention, even with hands-free functionality.
-Aim high when looking out over the handlebars at the road.
-Keep your eyes moving, meaning don't just stare at the road ahead; check mirrors and other views frequently.
-Leave yourself an out; this means anticipating what would happen if you had to swerve or slam on the brakes.

 

 

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