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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-081 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Meade, Maryland, died in a PMV-2 mishap 27 July 2021 in Newark, Delaware, at 1700 local. The Soldier was operating his sport bike when he hit the side of a civilian SUV crossing the highway. Local authorities responded and the Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. The Soldier was reportedly wearing personal protective equipment. He reportedly had not completed the proper Military SportBike RiderCourse (MSRC). It is unknown at this time if speed or alcohol were factors. This mishap is still under investigation by the local police department.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap was the 19th PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Here are some important safety tips to follow when negotiating a curve

Maintain a space cushion: A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

•Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – make it four or five seconds in inclement weather.
•Avoid distractions, including mobile phones and other devices, which can divert your attention, even with hands-free functionality.
•Aim high when looking out over the handlebars at the road.
•Keep your eyes moving, meaning don't just stare at the road ahead; make sure to check mirrors and other views frequently.
•Leave yourself an out; this means anticipating what would happen if you had to swerve or slam on the brakes.
•Position both hands firmly but comfortably on handlebars.
•Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.
•Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.
•Often drivers do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.
•Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.


Advanced Training: Required per AR 385-10

Advanced motorcycle training can teach you how to better control your motorcycle. Your control, handling and abilities on the bike will improve and you’ll learn to deal better with all kinds of weather, traffic and unexpected road conditions. You’ll be able to confidently handle dangerous driving situations, understand how to better maintain your motorcycle, and have a more smooth and safe ride.

 

 

PLR 21-080 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-2 mishap 25 July 2021 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, at 0110 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he was cut off by a civilian vehicle, striking the rear of the vehicle. An onsite witness called emergency medical services and the Soldier was transported to the local medical center where he was pronounced dead by the attending physician. Initially, the driver of the civilian vehicle fled the scene; however, two days later, she turned herself in and was arrested. The Soldier completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse in May 2020 and purchased the motorcycle in early June 2021. Specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed and alcohol/drugs as contributing factors, are unknown at this time. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release the final report.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 18th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.


Motorcycle Safety Tips

Night Riding: Quite often you’ll have to ride at night. After all, it is dark 50 percent of the time. Dusk is the worst time, when people’s eyes are adjusting from daylight to headlights. Be especially careful just after sunset. The following tips might help:

•Slow down a little when riding at night, especially on any sort of winding road.
•Use your own headlights and those of other traffic to keep an eye on the road surface. At night, it is more difficult to see that patch of sand or something that falls out of a pickup truck.
•Distance between you and the vehicle in front becomes even more important at night. Give yourself room to react.
•Wear a clear face shield without scratches. A scratched shield can create light refraction that might confuse you; two headlights can look like four, and you don’t know who is coming from where.
•One of your biggest hazards at night may be another driver coming from a few hours of drinking.
•Be especially alert for drivers and vehicles doing odd things, like weaving in and out of traffic, and give them lots of room.

 

 

PLR 21-078 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
An active duty for special work Corporal assigned to the Army National Guard, Fullerton, California, died in a PMV-2 mishap 16 July 2021 in Redlands, California, at 0033 local. The Soldier was speeding through a curve when he lost control and struck a pole. It is unknown who notified emergency service personnel. The Soldier’s completion of mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation training and use of personal protective equipment have not been verified. Alcohol as a contributing factor to the mishap is also unknown at this time. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the local sheriff’s department to release its report.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 17th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.


Motorcycle Safety Tips

What can riders do to share the road more safely?

In most cases you will meet turns and curves on the road, so you need to learn how to ride your motorcycle through a curve.

•There are things you need to remember. First, with increased motorcycle speed, it will be harder for you to change directions. When you ride a bicycle, you just turn the handlebar toward the direction you want to go. It becomes the opposite when you are riding a motorcycle. Second, turning a motorcycle is done by counter-steering, meaning you need to shift the handlebars in the opposite direction of where you actually want to go. If you are going right, you have to push forward slightly against the handlebar grip on the right. This will actually turn the handlebar to the left. As the handlebar turns to the left, the motorcycle will lean to the right, which is direction you wanted to travel.

•As you approach a curve, slow down to a good entry speed that will allow you to roll on the throttle as you prepare to navigate the curve, and speed up later. You can gently use the rear brake for this. Position your motorbike outside for the turn, which means if you are turning left, your bike should be about three feet from the right side of the lane. When you want to turn right, the motorcycle should be about three feet from the centerline of the road.

•Look at where you are headed as this is where you want your motorcycle to go. If possible, identify the exit point of the curve to where the road gets straight again. You are not yet negotiating the curve at this point. You are still preparing to enter the curve.

•Remember the counter-steering technique. This is where you apply it – at the start of your entry into the curve. Keep your throttle open and roll to the curve, initially keeping a good distance away from the inside of the curve. As the angle of the curve tightens, you should be leaning closer to the curve. Point your eyes in the direction you want to the motorcycle to go. At the same time, you should be aware of incoming traffic from the opposite direction.
When you can see the exit point of the curve, position your bike to aim for a much more straighter line instead of following the angle of the curve all the way through, as you might end up bumping the rock face, a road barrier or the ditch. The weave pattern is more like outside, inside and then outside again. Do not use your brakes as you negotiate the curve, as your motorcycle will bobble and you will lose traction. You turn the throttle on here without pulling on the clutch to keep you motorcycle stable.

•Accelerate after you have negotiated the tightest angle of the curve and you can already see where the road becomes straight again. You should be moving away from the inside of the curve and more toward the inner lane as you accelerate. Acceleration will push your motorcycle up straight again as you prepare to ride on a straight lane.

•Your body should lean slightly with the bike as you negotiate the curve. Your first instinct would be to keep your body on a straight line when making a turn, but you need to practice until you gain confidence, as you have to be one with your bike when riding a motorcycle. Learn to lean with it, whether it is making a right or a left turn, and you will soon have a far more enjoyable ride. Keep on practicing until you have mastered the art of riding through a curve.

 

 

PLR 21-077 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
An Active Guard Reserve Sergeant assigned to the Army National Guard, Nashville, Tennessee, died in a PMV-2 mishap 18 July 2021 in Johnson City, Tennessee, at 0251 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he lost control, left the roadway and impacted a ditch. Another Soldier following behind him in a private motor vehicle stated the Soldier was traveling at a high rate of speed at the time of the mishap. Alcohol reportedly was not a contributing factor. The Soldier’s completion of mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s training and personal protective equipment use have not been verified. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their report.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the 16th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.

Motorcycle Safety Tips

What can riders do to share the road more safely? Check out these motorcycle riding safety tips:

1. Wear a helmet!
A helmet is essential for safe riding. Helmets are your best defense against a serious brain injury should you get in a motorcycle accident. Not all states require riders wear a helmet, but you should. Make sure it fits securely and is up to the highest safety standards.

2. Get comfortable with your motorcycle.
Each motorcycle is unique, so if you’ve upgraded or gotten a new one, you should take some time to try it out and get familiar with its quirks in a controlled environment. Spend some time getting to know how your motorcycle handles turns, your weight, and familiarize yourself with where all its bells and whistles are located so you won’t be fishing around during a ride!

3. Check your bike before every ride.
A quick check to ensure everything is in working order will save you from starting a doomed trip. Check your tires (their pressure and depth), turn signals, and hand and foot brakes, as well as and your fluid levels, before departing from home. After that, a quick look to ensure nothing is leaking and you’ll be ready to ride.

4. Ride defensively.
Do not assume you can be seen by drivers on the road. Motorcycles are smaller than cars and can easily slip into a driver’s blind spot. Keep your lights on while riding and try to wear bright or reflective clothing.
When riding, do so defensively. This means giving yourself plenty of room to make turns and change lanes, driving within the speed limit and assuming drivers won’t be able to see what you’re doing. Recklessly cutting in front of cars could land you in the hospital … or worse.


5. Obey the rules of the road.
The best way to stay safe is to ride as safely as possible! Follow all lane markings, posted signs and speed limits. Yield to those who have the right of way and avoid speeding and cutting off others. You never know when road conditions could change.

6. Be aware of the weather.
Changes in weather can be dangerous for motorcycles, as slippery roads can cause you to lose control. Be aware of conditions for the day before you set out, and have a plan for what to do if the weather worsens.

7. Don’t drink and ride.
Motorcyclists are more likely to die in a drunk driving crash than drivers. Don’t become a sad statistic; be sure to avoid driving under any kind of influence, when drowsy and while distracted.

 

 

PLR 21-071 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado, died 3 July 2021 from injuries sustained in a PMV-2 mishap that occurred on 24 June 2021, at approximately 2030 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle, when he reportedly lost control while negotiating a curve, suffering a broken neck. He was air lifted to the local hospital and underwent surgery to reduce brain swelling. The Soldier’s family made the decision to remove him from life support and he died shortly after. Initial reports indicate that alcohol and drugs were not involved and speed as a contributing factor is unknown at this time. The Soldier was wearing all of the required personal protective equipment and completed the mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Basic RiderCourse courses.
The Soldier was an active participant in the Battalion and Brigade Motorcycle Mentorship Program and had recently completed a check ride on 20 May 2021. He had a documented T-CLOCS inspection of his motorcycle, dated 27 May 2021.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the 15th off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.


Many motorcycle riders are seriously injured and die each year when they fail to negotiate turns or curves, and either end up in the opposing lane of traffic, or lose control and crash.

What is one of the main reasons motorcycle riders fail to negotiate curves or turns? Excessive speed or going too fast for road conditions.

If you ride too fast through a curve or turn, chances are you are going to either end up in the opposing lane, or you are going to crash.

What is the safest way to avoid crashing on a curve or turn? Slow down!

When approaching a curve, choose a speed and lean angle that allow you to pass through the curve in your own lane without applying the brakes. Excessive speed, improper lean angle or braking in a curve can cause loss of control. Ground clearance is reduced when the motorcycle leans. Do not allow components to contact the road surface when leaning the motorcycle in a curve, as this could cause loss of control.

Check out the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center’s website for Defense Safety Oversight Council Motorcycle Mentorship Module 24 - Cornering: Proper Speed and Lane Position: https://safety.army.mil/Portals/0/Documents/OFF-DUTY/PMV-2/MMP/DSOCMENTORSHIPMODULES/Standard/24_Cornering-Proper_Speed_and_Lane_Position_09-12_Rev.pdf

 

 

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