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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-035 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky, died in a PMV-2 mishap 4 March 2021 in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, at 1345 local. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation training, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are unknown at this time. It was confirmed that the Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment. The safety point of contact is still waiting for local authorities to release additional information.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the ninth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

- Avoid distractions, including mobile phones and other devices, which can divert your attention, even with hands-free functionality.
- Aim high when looking out over the handlebars at the road.
- Keep your eyes moving, meaning don't just stare at the road ahead; frequently check mirrors.
- Leave yourself an out; this means anticipating what would happen if you had to swerve or slam on the brakes.
- Position both hands firmly but comfortably on handlebars.
- Never drive while feeling drowsy or sleepy; pull over at a rest stop or other safe place to take a break and get some real rest.

 

 

PLR 21-030 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 16 January 2021 in El Paso, Texas, at 1435 local. The Soldier was operating his sport bike in a roundabout when he hit a curb and lost control. The motorcycle struck a sand berm, then another curb before the Soldier was ejected from the bike. He was transported to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead by the local medical examiner. Speed is reportedly a contributing factor. The Soldier had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Basic RiderCourse and was wearing personal protective equipment. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the eighth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21.

Roundabouts are becoming more and more common on American roads, but sometimes even the most seasoned driver can get confused when faced with one of these enigmatic traffic circles. Who gives way to whom? Which direction do you signal? How on earth do you navigate roundabouts with multiple lanes?

Slow on approach
One of the advantages of a roundabout is that it does not stop traffic like a stop sign or a red light would. If a roundabout is empty, you do not have to stop before entering. However, that does mean that you must exercise extra caution on approach and make sure it is completely safe before entering. Slow down when you are approaching a roundabout, and if the way is clear, then you can proceed.

Give way to the person who is already on the roundabout
The first and most important rule of a roundabout is that you give way to vehicles that are already occupying it. Just as you would when entering a regular road, you must wait until there is sufficient space to enter the roundabout.

Give way to the left
When two or more vehicles approach a roundabout at the same time, you must then give way to the vehicle to the left. Otherwise it is first come, first served.

Signal your intent
One of the most common mistakes people use on roundabouts is signaling incorrectly or not at all. When used properly, indicators can be an excellent way to increase safety and convenience on a roundabout by letting those around you know your intentions. A good rule of thumb is to always signal immediately before your exit, using your right indicator, just as you would when turning. Correct indication on a roundabout goes as follows:
–When turning right (first exit), signal right as with a normal right turn.
–When going straight ahead, no signal upon entering, signal as you approach your exit.
–When turning left (last exit/three-quarters around), signal left upon entering, switch to right as you come to the exit.

When there are two lanes:
Just when you think that you’ve mastered the roundabout, along comes one with two lanes circling around it. Dealing with two lanes can be intimidating, but the reality is that it is not all that different from a regular, smaller roundabout. Often there will be a sign indicating which lane you should take, but if not, here are some guidelines:
–If you are turning right (first exit), take the outside lane.
–If you are going straight or the second exit, take the outside lane
–If you are taking a further exit, take the innermost lane and move over prior to your exit, after the first or second exit.

Proceed with extra caution if the roundabout has curbed edges so that you do run your vehicle over the curb. This could result in causing your vehicle to swerve back into the traffic already in the roundabout.

 

 

PLR 21-013 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Whiteman Armory, Missouri, died in a PMV-2 mishap 6 November 2020 in Springfield, Missouri, at 0330 local. At this time, it is unknown if the Soldier was the operator or passenger. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, use of personal protective equipment, completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors are currently unknown. The safety point of contact is waiting for local authorities to release additional information.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the sixth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

 

PLR 21-008 PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in an PMV-2 mishap 7 November 2020 at 1500 local. The Soldier lost control of his motorcycle on a highway when he was sideswiped by a van attempting to change lanes. He was declared dead at the local university hospital. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment; however, he did not complete any of the mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation training courses. Alcohol is not suspected as a contributing factor to the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the seventh off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

-Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

-Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

-Often drivers do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

-Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.

-What will stop or prevent the occurrence of accidents is more rigorous and advanced motorcycle training.

-Training can make riders vigilant and develop presence of mind while on the road. It will also promote safe and defensive riding habits, proactive behaviors and visual alertness.

-Quality motorcycle training gives the riders an understanding and observance of road and traffic rules, as well as a healthy road disposition.

-Invest in a top-quality helmet to efficiently protect the most critical part of your body.

-More importance should be given to developing skill in motorcycle operating proficiency through training that will ensure the rider’s continued safety on the road.

 

 

PLR 21-007 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in an off-duty PMV-2 mishap 31 October 2020 in Clarksville, Tennessee, at 1450 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle with a civilian passenger when a tire detached from another vehicle and struck him. The Soldier and passenger were transported to a local health care center via Life Flight, where he was pronounced dead upon arrival. The passenger’s current status is unknown. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment and completed all mandatory Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. Speed and alcohol and drug use are unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 27 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap was the fifth off-duty PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of PMV-2 fatalities for the same time period last year.

-Road hazards are a common cause of motorcycle accidents. Things that have little effect on a car, such as debris, uneven road surfaces, small objects or wet pavement, can cause a motorcycle to crash. Motorcyclists should understand what constitutes a hazard, be alert for such dangers and take precautions to avoid them.

-Debris or objects in the road, such as parts of tire treads, items fallen from trucks (furniture, tools, boxes), branches or rocks, are more hazardous to motorcycles than cars. Not only can they cause a crash, but the object itself can hit and seriously harm the rider.

-When you are riding your motorcycle, always remain vigilant. Anticipate that motorists, road debris and flying objects will come at you because they do! Keep your eyes and your ears open and expect the worst so you can prevent it.

-Do not tailgate trucks or trailers hauling materials, and always keep enough room to avoid debris and obstacles on the road.

-Do not ride directly next to vehicles, and try to keep a 2 to 3 second distance between you and any cars in front of you.

-If you see debris or something flying at you, do not panic! Try to calmly process what is happening and take evasive maneuvers. If you panic, you may overreact and crash your motorcycle instead of maneuvering around the hazard calmly.

 

 



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