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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-033 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 26-year-old Specialist assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 17 April 2022 in Dekalb County, Georgia, at 0315 local. The Soldier was attending U.S. Army Basic Airborne School, Fort Benning, Georgia, and had signed into school on 8 April 2022. He was involved in a vehicle mishap and sustained fatal injuries. Initial reports indicate he was wearing his seat belt. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the mishap sequence, speed, and the involvement of alcohol or drugs are currently unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the Dekalb County Sheriff’s Office to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 11th PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

 

PLR 22-029 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 30-year-old Staff Sergeant assigned to Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, died in a PMV-4 mishap 12 March 2022 in Eastover, South Carolina, at 2230 local. The Soldier reportedly rear-ended a civilian pickup truck at a high rate of speed, causing his vehicle to flip into the median. The Soldier sustained fatal injuries. The pickup truck ran off the left side of the road into the median. It is unknown who notified 911. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the Soldier’s use of a seat belt and the involvement of alcohol or drugs, are also unknown. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for the South Carolina Highway Patrol to release its final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 10th PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Speeding endangers everyone on the road.In 2019, speeding killed 9,478 people. We all know the frustrations of modern life and juggling a busy schedule, but speed limits are put in place to protect all road users.
For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2019, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

Speeding and alcohol impairment often coincide; this varies with driver age. While 25% of speeding drivers under age 21 involved in fatal crashes are alcohol impaired (BAC = 0.08+ g/dL), over 40% in the 21 to 44 age groups are impaired. The percent of alcohol-impaired drivers falls sharply to 32% among 55- to 64-year-old drivers and continues to decline as the driver age increases.
In 2019, almost 3 in 4 (74%) of speeding drivers involved in fatal crashes between midnight and 3 a.m. were alcohol-impaired (BAC of .08 g/dL or higher) compared to 43%of non-speeding drivers.

 

PLR 22-028 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 30-year-old Captain assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 11 March 2022 in South Bend, Indiana, at 2115 local. The Soldier was operating his vehicle when another vehicle, traveling at a high rate of speed, crossed the centerline and struck him head on. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene. Local law enforcement confirmed there was no alcohol involvement by the Soldier. It is unknown who notified 911. The Soldier's use of a seat belt is also unknown. This mishap is currently being investigated by the Benton County Sheriff’s Department.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the ninth PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

 

PLR 22-023 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, died in a PMV-4 mishap 5 February 2022 in Springfield, Tennessee, at 0420 local. The Soldier was traveling westbound on I-24 when he lost control of his vehicle and struck a tree. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the Soldier’s use of seat belt, speed, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are currently unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the eighth PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


According to the National Sleep Foundation, about half of U.S. adult drivers admit to consistently getting behind the wheel while feeling drowsy. About 20% admit to falling asleep behind the wheel at some point in the past year – with more than 40% admitting this has happened at least once in their driving careers.

These startling figures show how prevalent drowsy driving is. What drivers may not realize is how much drowsy driving puts themselves – and others – at risk. In fact, an estimated 5,000 people died in 2015 in crashes involving drowsy driving, according to a Governors Highway Safety Association report.

Driving while drowsy is similar to driving under influence of alcohol:

• Drivers’ reaction times, awareness of hazards and ability to sustain attention all worsen the drowsier the driver is.
• Driving after going more than 20 hours without sleep is the equivalent of driving with a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.08% – the U.S. legal limit.
• You are three times more likely to be in a car crash if you are fatigued.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, every year about 100,000 police-reported crashes involve drowsy driving. These crashes result in more than 1,550 fatalities and 71,000 injuries. The real number may be much higher, however, as it is difficult to determine whether a driver was drowsy at the time of a crash.

A study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimated that 328,000 drowsy driving crashes occur annually. That's more than three times the police-reported number. The same study found that 109,000 of those drowsy driving crashes resulted in an injury and about 6,400 were fatal. The researchers suggest the prevalence of drowsy driving fatalities is more than 350% greater than reported.

Beyond the human toll is the economic one. NHTSA estimates fatigue-related crashes resulting in injury or death cost society $109 billion annually, not including property damage.

Interventions for Drowsy Driving
Drowsy driving affects everyone, but especially those under age 25, who make up an estimated 50% or more of drowsy driving crashes.

That means interventions focusing on this age group – males especially – can help reduce drowsy driving among those vulnerable. One such intervention is for parents to incorporate discussions and rules on drowsy driving while completing their parent-teen driving agreements.

Ways to reduce drowsy driving include:
• Crash avoidance technologies: New and existing safety technologies, such as drowsiness alert and lane-departure warnings, can detect common drowsy driving patterns and warn drivers to stay in their lane or take a break.
• Getting more sleep: According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society, adults should get seven or more hours of sleep each night.
• Medication labels: A 2015 article by Consumer Reports found that side effects warnings are not always clear; new labeling guidelines may help drivers understand when to drive or not drive after taking these medications.
• Employers: Workplaces with strong off-the-job safety and health programs can include key information on getting sufficient sleep and refraining from driving drowsy

 

PLR 22-021 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Corporal assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina died in a PMV-4 mishap 29 January 2022 in Sanford, North Carolina, at 0843 local. Initial reports indicate the Solder lost control of the vehicle due to black ice, left the road and struck a tree. A civilian discovered the vehicle and called the Sanford Police Department. Emergency medical services transported the Soldier to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead upon arrival by the attending physician. Once he was identified as an Army Soldier, the local authorities contacted the Fort Bragg provost marshal office. Preliminary reports indicate the Soldier was wearing his seat belt, and alcohol or drugs were not involved. Speed as a contributing factor is unknown at this time. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report.
Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the seventh PMV-4 fatality of FY22 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Black Ice

Understanding Black Ice Those who haven’t heard of black ice might think it’s, well, black, but that isn’t the case. Its ice that forms on the road, but it contains fewer air bubbles than other ice. This makes black ice especially hard to detect when driving. Sometimes it might simply look like a spot of water on the road. However, while it might look innocent, it is anything but. Black ice is one of the most dangerous things you can run into while driving your car, truck or SUV.

You’ll typically see black ice forming when the ground temperature hits freezing but sleet or rain is falling. In many cases, it forms in the night since sunlight can melt both ice and snow. When it cools down again, the water can freeze into ice. The worst places for black ice are near the bottom of inclines and around curves, as well as areas that collect water normally. In most cases, you aren’t going to notice black ice until you are already on top of it.

Spotting Black Ice Early
It’s difficult to notice black ice since it appears to be nothing more than water. However, being aware of the weather conditions is a big part of it. If you know that it may go below freezing, or it already has, it’s best to assume that any water you see on the road could be ice. While this won’t be accurate, it will keep you safe in the event that it is. When you treat every situation as if the worst possible result will happen, you might have to be more cautious and aware, but you will also be less likely to end up in an accident.

Ways to Avoid Black Ice
If it’s chilly outside, you may find yourself on black ice at any moment. It’s important to be vigilant and aware of what is going on around you. If you see a spot of water and think it might be black ice, drive around it if that’s something you can safely do. Being aware of the areas in town where black ice is common is also helpful because you can choose alternate routes when it’s below freezing. You should also watch for stranded drivers or skid marks, since that can be the sign of ice nearby.


Safety Tips for Driving on Black Ice
Since it’s impossible to avoid black ice in areas that get cold, the best thing you can do is be prepared. The black ice safety tips below will help you keep safe even if you happen onto a patch of invisible ice.

1 – Drive Steadily and Slowly
Those who are familiar with driving on snow know that it’s best to drive slowly, but at a steady pace. That is the best option when there may be black ice, as well. The difference is that snow can provide you with traction while black ice is smooth and is not going to help your tires stick. What that means is that if you are going too quickly, you might find that you can’t stop once you hit a patch of the invisible ice. The moment you realize you are on black ice, remove your foot from the gas as quickly as possible.

Another part of this tip is that you should keep your wheel straight as much as possible, which can help you coast right over the ice without an accident. If you happen to turn your wheel on the ice, you will be much more likely to lose control of your car. If your car begins to skid, you want to turn into the skid, not against it. Doing otherwise can send you shooting across the road in the wrong direction.

2 – Don’t Use Your Brakes
One tip for driving on black ice is that you should lay off the brakes. With a lot of driving situations that escalate into emergencies, the brakes can help you out of a jam. That isn’t the case for this problem. As you approach an icy patch, let your foot leave the brakes as early as possible. If this can be done before reaching the ice, that’s the best scenario. If your car is going a little too fast, you can pump the brakes, rather than slamming onto them to avoid a skid. Slamming on your brakes on black ice is the worst thing you can do, and it can escalate the problem.

3 – Understand What to Do During a Skid
The worst thing you can do during a skid on black ice is over-correcting. What this often does is make the problem more severe and send you spinning around the opposite direction. Instead, you want to turn into the skid and start pumping your bakes. When the skid begins to end, you will want to bring the steering wheel back to the normal position. After you find traction again, you can begin to correct the direction of your car. Be one of the cars driving on black ice with a driver who knows the proper protocol to avoid more trouble.

4 – Be Aware of What Will Not Help
When it comes to snow, four-wheel drive, studded tires and snow chains can be a huge help. This is unfortunately not the case with black ice. Because there is no traction available on black ice, you can’t really do much to improve it. Many people think they are less likely to end up in trouble using these devices, but that’s not true. You still need to be careful and watch your surroundings as you drive in freezing weather. It’s an even better plan to have an emergency kit available so you can keep safe until help arrives if something goes wrong.

5 – Pay Attention to the Temperature
Almost every car that you can buy today has an external temperature readout. If you pay extra attention to the reading during the winter months, you’ll be better prepared to handle black ice when it happens. As soon as the reading drops below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, be more cautious. You may even want to do this if the temperature is a few degrees away since your readings may not be 100% accurate at all times.

If you follow these tips for driving on black ice, you’ll be much less likely to end up injured or in an accident. After you get used to the process, it will become second nature and you won’t even have to think much about it. Nobody wants to end up in an accident, especially when it’s freezing outside, so do whatever you can to avoid that situation for yourself.

 

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