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Since lagging indicators don’t explain the “why” behind the bottom line, organizations may tend to respond with broad, generalized corrective actions. Waiting for the damage to be done before addressing the risks may send a message that worker health and safety isn’t a priority. It’s an approach that can impair an organization’s efforts at building a positive safety culture.

Rested and Ready

Showing up to the mission in a fatigued state is unacceptable. This happens all too often in aviation. One of my recent flight manuals stated: “A pilot must show up to work free of stress.” Although we may not be stress-free, we may show up well rested and mentally ready to go the distance. A bright-eyed pilot is the best defense against adverse and sudden changes in the cockpit.

  • 28 April 2024
  • Comments: 0
Crosswalk Catastrophes

Since I am lucky enough to live in an area with year-round nice weather, I have eschewed the treadmill and opted to trek the sidewalks near my home. Now that I am spending more time as a pedestrian, I’ve discovered many drivers do not respect foot travelers (surprise!).

  • 21 April 2024
  • Comments: 0
Racing Toward Disaster

My commute to and from work is about as simple as I could want. I travel on rural roads, except for a 10-minute jaunt on a major highway. If I were ever to be involved in an accident, I figured the highway would be the most likely place due to the increased traffic I encounter there. Therefore, I tend to drive that stretch more cautiously. That reasoning helped contribute to a close call one lazy Sunday afternoon.

  • 21 April 2024
  • Author: USACRC Editor
  • Number of views: 120
  • Comments: 0
More than Words

The importance of wearing a seat belt is stressed before just about every convoy, training safety briefing and weekend. Like most young Soldiers, I listened to the words and would say “Hooah!” after my leaders were finished briefing. Also like most young Soldiers, I was only responding out of habit, not compliance.

  • 21 April 2024
  • Author: USACRC Editor
  • Number of views: 151
  • Comments: 0
A Feline FOD Check

Foreign object damage on a military aircraft is a serious issue. Before every mission, the entire flight crew, which is five personnel on a CH-47, checks for foreign object debris (FOD) and ensures the aircraft is ready for the mission. Depending on the crew, preflight can take anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour and a half. It is supposed to be a thorough process. During deployments, however, you get into a battle rhythm and things can go unnoticed due to the monotony of day-after-day operations. In any military aviation setting, that can be devastating.

  • 14 April 2024
  • Author: USACRC Editor
  • Number of views: 382
  • Comments: 0
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