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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 21-002 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Irwin, California, died in a PMV-2 mishap 11 October 2020 near Huntington Beach, California, at 0400 local. The regimental staff duty noncommissioned officer received a call from the Soldier’s father stating the Soldier and his brother were involved in a crash while riding separate motorcycles. The brother reportedly died on the scene. The Soldier was transported by first responders to the local medical center, where he died during surgery. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of personal protective equipment, completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses, and contributing factors are unknown at this time due to lack of witnesses. The unit is awaiting additional information from the local authorities.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the second PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Create a space cushion around your vehicle.

A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – four or five seconds in inclement weather.

If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.

 

 


PLR 21-001 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Rucker, Alabama, died in a PMV-2 mishap 8 October 2020 in Newton, Alabama, at 1625 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he collided with a vehicle that pulled out in front of him. He was transported to the local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment and had completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic RiderCourse I and II. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This mishap is the first PMV-2 fatality of FY21 and above the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

Drivers often do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.


Create a space cushion around your vehicle.

A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

Keep at least a three-second following distance in front of you – four or five seconds in inclement weather.

If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.

 

 

PLR 20-090 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Specialist assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 30 September 2020 in El Paso, Texas, at 2238 local. The Soldier suffered fatal injuries when his motorcycle was struck by another vehicle that ran a red light. He was pronounced dead by the medical examiner’s office. The Soldier was wearing all required personal protective equipment but was counseled by the unit commander not to ride, and not authorized to ride a motorcycle. He did not complete the required Motorcycle Safety Foundation BasicRider Course (BRC-I). The involvement of alcohol is unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the 22nd PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period the previous year.


Motorcycle Safety Tips for Car Drivers:
Driving with a motorcycle near you isn’t like driving with other cars. Motorcycles are often smaller and harder to see, plus they don't have the safeguards of metal framing, seatbelts, or airbags when it comes to protection from collision. That's why drivers sharing the road with motorcycles need to be extra careful so everyone arrives at their destination safely.

Here are some important ways drivers can observe motorcycle safety:
- Always signal, check mirrors, and check blind spots. These behaviors are good habits to begin with, and they are doubly important when sharing the road with motorcycles. Because they are more compact, motorcycles may go unnoticed in a casual glance before a lane change, especially in low light or bad weather.

- Large vehicles, watch out! If you are driving a big truck or a van, you already know that your vision can be limited. Your blind spots are larger than those of other vehicles, making it harder to see smaller cars and motorcycles around you. Be cautious when making turns or changing lanes by keeping in mind that a biker might be harder to see.

- Give them the whole lane. You may think that because motorcycles are smaller and don't take up the entire lane, it's alright to pass them in the same lane. Think again. Give a bike the full lane, the same way you would any other car and driver.

- Treat motorcycle turn signals with caution. If you approach a motorcycle with an activated turn signal, wait for a moment to see what they'll do. Unlike cars, most motorcycle signals often aren't self-cancelling, so the driver has to remember to manually turn the signal off. Give yourself and the motorcyclist a moment to ensure they are actually turning.

- Give motorcycles extra following and passing distance. Many motorcyclists often slow down by only rolling off the throttle or downshifting (instead of outright braking), so you may not always see brake lights to alert you of a bike's stop. Allow for three to four seconds of following time for motorcycles, and always assume a bike will brake when approaching a stop at an intersection. Drivers who cut off or unintentionally pull in front of a motorcycle without allowing enough space can force the rider to over-brake, slide and fall.

Motorcycle Safety Tips for Bikers:
Bikers themselves should always make sure to take precautions of their own, including wearing the right gear and riding in the right part of the lane. For more motorcycle driving tips visit https://safety.army.mil/OFF-DUTY/PMV-2-Motorcycles

 

 

PLR 20-088 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Soldier assigned to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, was involved in a PMV-2 mishap 14 September 2020, in Pulaski County, Missouri. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle when he struck a deer. He was evacuated via Life Flight to the nearest trauma center and died 11 days later. Completion of required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses have not been verified. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of personal protective equipment, speed, and alcohol and drug involvement are unknown at this time. The mishap is under investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This preventable mishap is the 21st PMV-2 fatality of FY20 and below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.

Safety Tips:

Think like a hunter:
You know who is rarely surprised by deer on the roads? Hunters, because they know where deer can be expected. If you’re going to ride in deer country you should learn to think like a hunter. Deer populations peak in the spring, but the risk of hitting them on the road peaks in October, November, and December, during the annual rut. Deer are on the move at this time of year. It’s also the time of year when mature adults weigh the most, making collisions that much worse.

Although you can encounter deer at any time of the day or night, they are most active between dusk and midnight, then again at first light. They typically spend the middle of the day in deep cover, but most deer are not really forest dwellers. Learn to identify edge habitat; prime food sources such as standing corn, mast crops like acorns, and orchards; and travel corridors like tree lines, hedgerows, and gullies. Deer are herd animals. If you see one crossing the road in front of you, be alert to others that might be following. If you scare it, it may well reverse course and cross your path again.

Assess and improve your skills:
Always cover the front brake. Practice emergency stops. When you spot a deer ahead, your front brake is a lifesaver, but only if you’re ready, willing, and able to use it right.

Play “What if?” with yourself. When you come across good deer habitat, ask yourself, “What would I do if a deer jumped out from behind that bush?” Mentally rehearse applying the brakes and aiming for a gap with aggressive counter-steering, not target-fixating on the deer.

I’ve heard people claim they increase speed, with the idea that spending less time near the deer limits the opportunity to hit it. In a worst-case scenario, you are better off scrubbing as much speed as possible and hitting them at a slower speed.

Ride for the conditions:
Don’t ignore deer crossing signs, especially at peak times! Wear a helmet and the best protective gear you can afford while operating a motorcycle. Anywhere that you could encounter deer you should also scan and assess the edges of the road. If the grass in the ditch is waist high, you won’t see deer until they step right onto the shoulder. Processing that additional visual information means slowing down for safety.

If you’re riding in a group, increase your following distance and maintain a staggered formation in order to give each rider time and space to brake and take evasive action. If you see deer ahead, slow down and do something (for example, raise an arm or stick out a leg, or flash your brake light) to ensure following riders notice, too. If you pass deer near the road, consider flashing your high beam or honking to warn oncoming drivers and riders.

Although lots of deer are hit on Interstate highways, the per-passenger-mile risk is much lower than the risk on country roads.

 

 

PLR 20-087 - PMV-2 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-2
A Lieutenant Colonel assigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, died in a PMV-2 mishap 26 September 2020 in Atchison, Kansas, at 1553 local. The Soldier was operating his motorcycle, with his spouse as a passenger, when he collided with another vehicle that failed to yield. Local authorities responded and both the Soldier and his spouse were taken to the local hospital. Upon arrival, the Soldier was pronounced dead by the attending physician. The Soldier’s spouse is hospitalized with non-fatal injuries. The Soldier completed all required Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the use of personal protective equipment, speed, and alcohol and drug involvement, are unknown at this time.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 28 Soldiers a year to PMV-2 mishaps. This is the 20th PMV-2 fatality of FY20 but below the number of fatalities for the same time period last year.


Remember these important safety tips when sharing the road with motorcycles:

•Motorcycles have use of the complete traffic lane. Do not share lanes with motorcycles.

•Failure to yield the right-of-way to a motorcyclist is the most frequent driver error in collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle.

•Often drivers do not see motorcyclists until it is too late. This is why it is important for drivers to continually scan the roadway in front, to the rear and to the sides.

•Motorcycles accelerate, turn and stop more quickly than other vehicles. Bad weather, rough road surfaces or inexperience may cause a motorcyclist to fall. All of these are reasons why you should increase your following distance to four seconds or more when behind motorcycles.


Create a space cushion around your motorcycle. A space cushion is a buffer around your vehicle that you maintain to allow room to maneuver, if necessary. Know what is in your space cushion, scan frequently and maintain awareness of other vehicles.

•If another vehicle is tailgating you, use your turn signal and change lanes as soon as it is safe to do so.

•If a driver near you is driving erratically or aggressively, put distance between you and the other driver by slowing down or changing lanes.


Things to consider before riding as a motorcycle passenger:

If you are comfortable with the skill level of the person you're riding with and have a mutual level of trust, then you're ready to enjoy the ride. Here are things to think about before you go:

•Have your own safety gear. What you wear is up to you, but you should be well aware that motorcycle accidents can cause harm very quickly, and protective gear is designed specifically to prevent that. A helmet is the most important piece of safety gear, but gloves, sturdy boots, strong pants, a long-sleeved shirt, and an armored motorcycle jacket are all important pieces of gear too. Borrow gear if you can, but if you'll be riding regularly, get your own.

•Know the type of bike they have. Some big touring bikes and cruisers have passenger seats that look like recliners, while sport bikes and other performance bikes have rear seats that are basically designed to say "nobody belongs here."

•Develop some kind of way to signal to each other while riding. At speed, the rider may not be able to hear a thing you're saying, so it helps to establish some way to communicate by touch. At a minimum, determine a way for you to signal to them when you want to slow down, speed up or stop. If they have a Bluetooth communication device, you can it use to talk to them during the ride even better.

 

 


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