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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-012 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to Ft. Campbell, Kentucky died in a PMV-4 mishap 24 November 2021 in Whites Creek, Tennessee near Nashville, at 0300 local. A group of Soldiers were traveling back to Ft. Campbell in a single vehicle when the driver lost control of the vehicle, while negotiating a sharp turn, and struck a rock wall. It is unknown who notified 911. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including the fatal Soldier’s position within the vehicle, speed, the Soldiers use of a seat belt, as well as alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are also unknown at this time. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the local law enforcement to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the sixth PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions
Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. Remember, your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

•Put down your phone. Smartphones and handheld electronic devices are a daily part of life, but they take your eyes off the road and distract your attention.

•Don’t wear headphones. Your ears will tell you a lot about what is happening around you – be sure to use them.

1. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
2. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
3. Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you are unfamiliar with the area in which you are driving.
4. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
5. Maintain the posted speed limit.
6. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

How to be a better passenger
•Share the responsibilities - make yourself useful, whether you offer to operate the satellite navigation or act as another set of eyes for the driver – can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue. Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task of driving.

•Banish backseat driving - Keeping a watchful eye for things the driver might miss is helpful; criticizing every move the driver makes could be harmful. If the driver gets frustrated or annoyed, the likelihood is they will pay less attention to the road, which could lead to an easily avoidable accident.

Every day, about 28 people in the United States die in drunk-driving crashes — that is one person every 52 minutes. In 2019, these deaths reached the lowest percentage since 1982 when NHTSA started reporting alcohol data — but still 10,142 people lost their lives. These deaths were all preventable.

In 2019, almost 74% of speeding drivers involved in fatal crashes between midnight and 3:00 a.m. were alcohol-impaired (blood alcohol concentration [BAC] of .08 g/dL or higher) compared to 43% of non-speeding drivers.

 

PLR 22-010 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
An Active Guard Reserve Staff Sergeant assigned to the Army National Guard, Hazen, Arkansas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 12 November 2021 in Bowie County, Texas, at 1940 local. The Soldier was operating her vehicle when a tractor trailer struck her rear bumper. As a result, she lost control and struck a concrete barrier. She was transported to the local medical center and pronounced dead upon arrival. It is unknown who notified 911. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including speed, the Soldier’s use of a seat belt, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are also unknown. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the Arkansas State Police to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the fifth PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

 

PLR 22-007 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Staff Sergeant assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 9 November 2021 in Belton, Texas, at 1738 local. The Soldier was traveling east when he lost control of his vehicle, struck a guard rail and exited the roadway. The vehicle traveled another 60 meters, coming to rest upside down in Nolan Creek, approximately 1 foot deep. It is unknown who called 911. The Soldier was pronounced dead at the scene and transported to the local medical center. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including seat belt use, speed, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are unknown at this time. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 4th PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions

Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. Remember, your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

1. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
2. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
3. Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
4. Focus as far to your front as possible, using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
5. Maintain the posted speed limit.
6. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

PLR 22-006 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 20-year-old Private First Class assigned to Fort Benning, Georgia, died in a PMV-4 mishap 30 October 2021 on the installation at approximately 0521 local. The Soldier was driving with another Soldier riding as a passenger when he lost control of the vehicle, causing it to overturn multiple times before coming to rest on its roof. The Soldiers were discovered by a hunter who called 911. The driver was pronounced dead at the scene. The passenger, who suffered non-fatal injuries, was transported to the local hospital for further evaluation and treatment. It is unknown exactly what time the mishap occurred. Speed and alcohol were reported as contributing factors to the mishap, and the Soldiers were wearing their seat belts. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for the results of the local investigation.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the third PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

How to be a better passenger

Share the responsibilities

Making yourself useful – whether you offer to operate the navigation or act as another set of eyes for the driver – can help avoid any accidents that would have happened due to distraction or driver fatigue. Keeping watch for any diversions and reading road signs will also help the driver to focus on the task at hand.

Banish backseat driving

Keeping a watchful eye for things the driver might miss is helpful; criticizing every move the driver makes could be harmful. If the driver gets frustrated or annoyed, the likelihood is they’ll pay less attention to the road, which could lead to an easily avoidable accident.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law

The consequences are far-ranging:
• Greater potential for loss of vehicle control;
• Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment;
• Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger;
• Increased degree of crash severity, leading to more severe injuries;
• Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and increased fuel consumption/cost.

 

PLR 22-005 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Chief Warrant Officer 2 assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, died in a PMV-4 mishap 3 November 2021 in Gatesville, Texas, at 1530 local. The Soldier’s vehicle hydroplaned into oncoming traffic and was struck on the passenger side by a civilian vehicle. The Soldier and driver of the other vehicle were both transported to the local hospital and admitted to the level one trauma unit. The Soldier had significant brain swelling and underwent surgery to relieve the pressure. Following surgery, the Soldier had no measurable brain activity and the family decided to remove him from life support. The Soldier was pronounced dead on 8 November. The specific circumstances of the mishap, including use of seat belts, speed, and alcohol or drugs as contributing factors, are unknown at this time. The safety/unit points of contact are waiting for local law enforcement to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the second PMV-4 fatality of FY22.

Driving safely on wet roads or in the rain can be challenging. When the road you're driving on doesn't drain well or the rain is heavy enough for puddles to form, it can become downright dangerous — especially if your tires are not ready for those conditions.

If you've ever driven on a wet road and felt your vehicle slipping or skidding for a split second or more, you were likely hydroplaning.

What is Hydroplaning?
Hydroplaning is skimming or sliding on top of a film of water between your tires and the road, resulting in a loss of steering capabilities and braking effectiveness. It happens when you drive over a wet surface faster than the tires can displace the water underneath them, resulting in loss of contact with the road.

How to Avoid Hydroplaning
Losing control of your vehicle even for a moment can be very unnerving, but there are steps you can take to try and avoid hydroplaning.

Ensure adequate tread depth on your tires:
Worn tires have less tread depth, which means they don't have the deep channels that are needed to move the water away effectively. This will cause the tires to ride on top of the water more easily, and if you're on top of the water, you don't have traction.

Checking tread depth is something you can easily do yourself:
Insert a penny in the center of your tire tread with Lincoln's head upside down and facing you; if you can see all of Lincoln's head, you have less than 2/32 inch of tread, and that's not enough to safely drive on a wet road.

Reduce your speed:
The most dangerous time to drive is immediately after it starts raining. The instant a drop hits your windshield, it is a good idea to slow down. Rain mixes with oil and rubber on the road, creating a slicker surface. Once the water pools even a little, hydroplaning is possible. The faster you drive in wet conditions, the less time your tires have to channel the water away. No matter how good or new your tires are, they will hydroplane at a certain speed.

Don't use cruise control:
It is never safe to use your cruise control in inclement weather, because you may need instant control of your speed in the event the car surprises you with a change in direction.

Drive in the tracks of the vehicle ahead:
Following the tracks of the car in front of you allows you to drive on strips of road where the amount of road water has already been dispersed by the previous vehicle, which means less water for your tires to navigate. Make sure to keep a safe distance.

Avoid puddles:
It takes only a small layer of water to hydroplane, so it's best to stay out of puddles altogether if you can. Keep in mind that the longer it rains and the deeper the puddle, the more likely you are to hydroplane.

What to Do if Your Vehicle Hydroplanes
The appropriate reaction in a moment like this can be the difference between recovery and further loss of control. Much like driving on ice, the best reaction is to not overreact.

Safe recovery is more about finesse than brute strength. If you panic and brake hard or try to speed up, you risk making the skid or slide worse.

If you feel your car changing direction on its own, let off the gas but don't hit the brake. Then, although it may seem counterintuitive, gently steer your car in the direction you are skidding. This is called "turning into the skid" and will help you regain control by realigning your tires with the direction your car is traveling.

Stay calm and wait for your tires to get their grip; stay alert for any other possible hydroplaning hazards ahead.

Thankfully, most hydroplaning situations last only a few seconds. Although it's important to know good techniques to deal with them, the best defense against hydroplaning is to make sure you have good tires and to maintain them properly. Check your tread depth and air pressure regularly and have them rotated every 3,000 to 6,000 miles or during each oil change.

Check out our “In the Spotlight” series from the ODSAP Presentation at the following link:
https://safety.army.mil/OFF-DUTY/Home-and-Family/Off-Duty-Safety-Awareness-Presentation-2021

 

 

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