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Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

About Preliminary Loss Reports (PLRs)

Preliminary Loss Reports provide leaders with awareness of Army loss and highlight potential trends that affect combat readiness. Within 72 hours of a loss, PLRs provide a synopsis of the incident: unit, date of loss, description of the activity at the time of the death. PLRs do not identify root causes of an accident, as the investigation is ongoing. Further details will be available later on RMIS (account required).

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PLR 22-004 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 29-year-old Specialist assigned to Camp Humphreys, Korea, died in a PMV-4 mishap 1 November 2021 in Pyeongtaek-Si, Korea, at 2308 local. The Soldier and two family members were traveling in their vehicle when they hit a civilian tow truck driven by a local national. The frontal impact and subsequent fire resulted in major damage to both vehicles and the deaths of the Soldier and his two family members. The local national was injured and taken to a local hospital. Local national emergency medical services and Korea National Police (KNP) arrived on the scene, followed by the military police. Speed was reportedly a contributing factor; however, the involvement of alcohol or drugs is unknown at this time. Due to the vehicle fire, it could not be determined if seat belts were used. The unit/safety points of contact are waiting for KNP to release their final report.

Since 2017, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the first PMV-4 fatality of FY22.



Here are few tips for driving in Korea:

South Korea drives on the right side of the road.

Speed limits in South Korea:

-Expressways – Varies from 100-120 km/hr
-Open roads – 80 km/hr
-City – Varies from 60-80 km/hr

Always follow posted speed limits (which can vary from these normal limits) and watch out for speed cameras, especially on motorways.

Priority/right of way – There are no clear rules regarding priority or right of way when approaching an intersection without traffic lights, so approach intersections with caution and assume the other driver wants to go first.

Children – Children under6 years old must use a car seat.

Seat belts – All passengers must wear a seat belt.


Traffic violations in Korea come with high penalties:


Traffic Violations Points System
Drivers accumulate points for traffic violations or traffic accidents. Once a certain number of points have been accumulated, the person's driving license may be canceled or suspended. For example, if a driver accumulates more than 40 penalty points for traffic violations, her/his license may be suspended. Cancellation of the license will occur if the driver has accumulated more than 121 points in one year, 201 points in 2 years or 271 points in 3 years. Refusal to submit to a breathalyzer test, leaving the scene of an accident and driving with a suspended license can result in immediate cancellation of one's driving license.

Point Penalties:
- 10 points: lane-changing violation, no-passing zone violation, engaging in disputes/arguments on the road that interferes with traffic, etc.
- 15 points: signal violation (crossing on a red/amber light), use of cellphone while driving, no-passing violation, exceeding speed limit by 20-40 km/hr, bus-only lane violation, etc.
- 30 points: crossing the center divider line, exceeding speed limit by 40 km/hr, driving on highway shoulder, railroad crossing violation, etc.
- 2-15 points per injury, depending on the seriousness (based on healing/treatment time) of the injury
- 90 points: per death if the victim dies within 72 hours of the accident


Drinking and driving is a serious offense in Korea.

a. Driving while intoxicated (this means a blood alcohol level of over 0.05%) is punishable by imprisonment of up to 2 years and a fine of up to 3 million won.

b. Driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.05-0.35% is punishable by law, and those with over 0.36% are arrested and detained.

c. Anyone who has been caught drinking and driving on three previous occasions is automatically detained, regardless of the degree of intoxication.
d. Penalties:
- Drivers with a blood alcohol level of 0.05% to 0.09% will have their license suspended for 100 days.
- Those found with a blood alcohol level of more than 0.10% or more than 0.05% when involved in an accident resulting in loss of life will have their license revoked.
- Drivers who refuse an alcohol level test face cancellation of their license.

 

 

PLR 21-100 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims Two Soldiers' Lives

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant First Class assigned to Medical Degree Preparatory University in Maryland, died in a PMV-4 mishap 26 September 2021 in Flintstone, Maryland at 1418 local. The Soldier was driving his Volkswagon Jetta while traveling eastbound on Interstate 68, east of Pleasant Valley Road. He struck the rear of a semi-tractor trailer as it was traveling in the same direction. The Soldier was pronounced deceased on scene. The passenger of the Soldier’s vehicle sustained serious injuries and was transported by the State Police to Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, West Virginia. Unknown at this time if speed or alcohol was a factor. The Maryland State Police is currently conducting the investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 36 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 44th PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions

Distractions are everywhere today and becoming more and more difficult to avoid. Remember that, as a pedestrian, your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

•Put down your phone. Smartphones and handheld electronic devices are a daily part of life, but they take your eyes off of the road and distract your attention.
•Don’t wear headphones. Your ears will tell you a lot about what is happening around you – be sure to use them.

1. Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
2. Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
3. Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
4. Pay attention to your surroundings especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
5. Focus as far to your front as possible using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
6. Maintain the posted speed limit.
7. Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 21-096 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A 43-year-old Active Guard Reserve Sergeant assigned to the Army National Guard, Columbia, South Carolina, died in a PMV-4 mishap 21 August 2021 in Saluda County, South Carolina, at 2355 local. The Soldier was traveling westbound when his vehicle left the road and struck a tree. The Saluda County Sheriff’s Department responded to the scene, and the Soldier was pronounced dead. He was not wearing a seat belt, and alcohol was suspected as a contributing factor. Speed as a contributing factor is currently unknown. It is also unknown who placed the 911 call. The state safety office is waiting for local law enforcement to release the final report.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 43rd PMV-4 fatality of FY21.



For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. Speed also affects your safety even when you are driving at the speed limit but too fast for road conditions, such as during bad weather, when a road is under repair, or in an area at night that isn’t well lit.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging:
-Greater potential for loss of vehicle control
-Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment
-Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger
-Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries
-Economic implications of a speed-related crash
-Increased fuel consumption/cost

One of the safest choices drivers and passengers can make is to buckle up. Many Americans understand the lifesaving value of the seat belt – the national use rate was at 90.3% in 2020. Seat belt use in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 14,955 lives in 2017.

Of those killed during the nighttime in 2019, 55% were unrestrained. In the instant you buckle up when driving or riding in the front seat of a car or truck, you cut your risk of a fatal injury in a crash nearly in half. That’s a massive return on the investment of the brief moment it takes to put on a seat belt.

Seat belts are the single-most effective safety technology in the history of the automobile. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study of lives saved by vehicle technologies found that, between 1960 and 2012, seat belts saved more lives — 329,715, to be exact — than all other vehicle technologies combined, including air bags, energy-absorbing steering assemblies and electronic stability control.

Tips provided by NHTSA.

 

 

PLR 21-095 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Sergeant assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, died in a PMV-4 mishap 13 September 2021 at 1618 local. When the Soldier did not report to 1700 formation, platoon leadership attempted to contact him via phone and social media. At 1830, company leadership notified the Fort Bragg military police desk that the Soldier was involved in a vehicle mishap. The Soldier was traveling northbound when he lost control of his vehicle and struck a tree, causing the vehicle to catch fire. First responders arrived on scene at approximately 1630 and were initially unable to identify the Soldier’s remains. The VIN and license plate of the vehicle were recovered and matched the Soldier’s vehicle. Additionally, a piece of mail was recovered from the wreckage that included the Soldier’s name and social security number. North Carolina State Highway Patrol is currently investigating the mishap.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 42nd PMV-4 fatality of FY21.


Stay Alert – Avoid Distractions
Distractions are everywhere and becoming more difficult to avoid. Your eyes and ears are your best tools for keeping safe. Stay alert and watch out.

1.Avoid distractions while operating a vehicle.
2.Your focus should be on the task of driving safely.
3.Pay attention to your surroundings, especially if you’re unfamiliar with the area you’re driving in.
4.Focus as far to your front as possible, using peripheral vision to scan for obstacles.
5.Maintain the posted speed limit.
6.Always wear your seat belt and ensure your passengers do the same.

 

 

PLR 21-094 - PMV-4 Mishap Claims One Soldier's Life

Posting Date:   /   Categories: Preliminary Loss Reports, PMV-4
A Specialist assigned to the Army National Guard, Thibodaux, Louisiana, died in a PMV-4 mishap 5 September 2021 in McAllen, Texas, at 0218 local. While deployed as part of Joint Task Force-Guardian Support (JTF-GS), three Soldiers were traveling in a GSA rental truck. The driver lost control and struck two light poles. The Soldier in the backseat was pronounced dead at the scene by emergency medical service personnel and transported to the Hidalgo County morgue in Edinburgh, Texas. The front-seat passenger, who was ejected through a window, sustained extensive injuries and was transported to a local hospital. He has undergone extensive surgeries, and the assigned medical team cannot yet determine if he will regain function of his right arm. The Soldier driving was the only person wearing a seat belt and did not sustain any injuries. Alcohol and speed were contributing factors to the mishap. The McAllen Police Department is currently conducting the investigation.

Since 2016, the Army has lost an average of 33 Soldiers a year to off-duty PMV-4 mishaps. This mishap was the 41st PMV-4 fatality of FY21.



Every day, about 28 people in the United States die in drunk-driving crashes — that's one person every 52 minutes. In 2019, these deaths reached the lowest percentage since 1982 when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration started reporting alcohol data — but still, 10,142 people lost their lives. These deaths were all preventable.

Alcohol is a substance that reduces the function of the brain, impairing thinking, reasoning and muscle coordination. All of these abilities are essential to operating a vehicle safely. As alcohol levels rise in a person’s system, the negative effects on the central nervous system increase. Alcohol is absorbed directly through the walls of the stomach and small intestine. Then it passes into the bloodstream, where it accumulates until it is metabolized by the liver. A person's alcohol level is measured by the weight of the alcohol in a certain volume of blood. This is called Blood Alcohol Concentration, or BAC. At a BAC of .08 grams of alcohol per deciliter (g/dL) of blood, crash risk increases exponentially. Because of this risk, it’s illegal in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher, except in Utah where the BAC limit is .05.

However, even a small amount of alcohol can affect driving ability. In 2019, there were 1,775 people killed in alcohol-related crashes where a driver had a BAC of .01 to .07 g/dL.

Speeding endangers everyone on the road. In 2019, speeding killed 9,478 people. We all know the frustrations of modern life and juggling a busy schedule, but speed limits are put in place to protect all road users.

For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in approximately one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities. In 2019, speeding was a contributing factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities.

Speeding and alcohol impairment often coincide; this varies with driver age. While 25% of speeding drivers under age 21 involved in fatal crashes are alcohol impaired (BAC = 0.08+ g/dL), over 40% in the 21 to 44 age groups are impaired. The percent of alcohol-impaired drivers falls sharply to 32% among 55- to 64-year-old drivers and continues to decline as the driver age increases.

 

 

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